To Insulate The Chicken House Or Not?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by JennB, May 21, 2010.

  1. JennB

    JennB Out Of The Brooder

    25
    0
    22
    May 21, 2010
    nashport, ohio
    I live in Central ohio, me and my husband are putting the final pieces to our chicken house, we cant decide if we need to insulate the walls and celling or not. the house is well built, with ventilation at the roof line and a window and a thin wooden human door. we have already put 2 ft of plywood on the inside walls, so the outer wall wont rot and plan to paint it. we plan to put cocking on any drafty areas. it can get pretty cold in the winter, jan. and feb. with little sun shine. so what do you think will my chickens be ok or should i insulate?
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2010
  2. NattiFan

    NattiFan Chillin' With My Peeps

    216
    0
    111
    Mar 1, 2010
    Plainfield, CT
    Living in New England, I thought about insulating as well. But then someone mentioned, and I'll just us an example...say your temps at night dip into the teens, the temp inside will get pretty close to that, and when the sun comes up, that insulation, is going to hold that temp inside instead of letting the inside temp adjust as the sun rises and the outside temp warms up during the cold winter days....it sounded like a good enough reason to me not to insulate. Good luck

    [​IMG]
     
  3. JennB

    JennB Out Of The Brooder

    25
    0
    22
    May 21, 2010
    nashport, ohio
    That makes sense, thanks
     
  4. MissJenny

    MissJenny Chillin' With My Peeps

    974
    4
    141
    May 11, 2009
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I'm in southern Ohio and I intend to insulate. Although NattiFan is almost right -- the insulation will tend to retain the overnight temperature -- but because the coop is insulated it won't get as cold inside as the temperature is outside.

    My goal is to be sure that the hens are not only comfortable, but that their feet and combs don't get frostbitten. So not only do I plan to insulate, I will run some sort of heat source, either a ceramic bulb or an oil radiator, to keep the temperature somewhere in the 30* range.

    My other notion about insulating is to help keep it cool in the summer. Between proper venting and fans I'd like to provide the girls with a home where they don't roast all summer long -- there are some determined predators here -- if they have to be locked up, and they do, they should be comfortable summer and winter. But I am like that!

    Jenny
     
  5. NattiFan

    NattiFan Chillin' With My Peeps

    216
    0
    111
    Mar 1, 2010
    Plainfield, CT
    Quote:Very good points here as well. I guess I'm basing my decission on the fact that I have a couple friends here that have had chickens for a few years each...both with coops that are not insulated and they have had no problems. Appreciate your thoughts....good food for thought.
     
  6. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

    11,744
    18
    321
    Apr 6, 2007
    Iceland
    Insulation has the potential to increase and hold condensation resulting in a moldy, unhealthy coop. Venting the coop in the summer and limiting drafts in the cold months is all you need to do.
     
  7. MeettheFlockers

    MeettheFlockers Chillin' With My Peeps

    180
    2
    111
    Apr 13, 2010
    Wisconsin
    I'm in Wisconsin and decided to insulate because of the potential of frostbite. A local farmer friend lost a few of his crew to cold and frostbite and recommended I insulate based on the smaller size of my coops and construction materials. To prevent mold, we used a mold coating on the insulation that was recommended and we placed venting inside.
     
  8. sixpantsmaloney

    sixpantsmaloney Out Of The Brooder

    39
    0
    32
    Apr 21, 2008
    I insulated and ventilated. The chickens were fine down to 0 degrees. I don't see where it could hurt.

    The argument about it not heating up seems based on thermal mass which insulation doesn't have. In direct sunlight just about anything heats up pretty quickly.

    You're probably fine either way.
     
  9. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Quote:I disagree with this. My coop is insulated, and I wouldn't have it any other way. In winter, it would warm up in there over the course of the day, and that warmth was held in over the night, lasting into the wee hours. Now, in summer time, it helps keep it much cooler in there through most of the day. It can be hot and muggy outside, but feels a lot better in the coop. If you can, insulate. It will make a big difference to you and your chickens.
     
  10. NattiFan

    NattiFan Chillin' With My Peeps

    216
    0
    111
    Mar 1, 2010
    Plainfield, CT
    Quote:I disagree with this. My coop is insulated, and I wouldn't have it any other way. In winter, it would warm up in there over the course of the day, and that warmth was held in over the night, lasting into the wee hours. Now, in summer time, it helps keep it much cooler in there through most of the day. It can be hot and muggy outside, but feels a lot better in the coop. If you can, insulate. It will make a big difference to you and your chickens.

    And now hearing this, I just may insulate. Thank you for your input.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by