Top Ten Worming and Wormer Misinformations - Graphic Pictures!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by casportpony, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    No. It's all about the chickens metabolism. Their system breaks down feed and liquids absorbing nutrients and minerals much much quicker than mammals. ALOT is excreted as waste, including wormers. Higher safeguard wormer doses and longer dosing days are required in order for the wormer to be effectively absorbed into the bloodstream....and it's very effective.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Goats, cows and horses get much less per pound than birds cats and dogs:
    Pictures below from Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook - 7th Edition



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    The doses I use have been recommended by veterinarians. [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015
  3. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Loving this country life Premium Member

    What about Valbazen liquid do you go by same measurements as the safe guard? and same length of days? last timeIi used safe Guard I put it into their feed for 5 days according to directions but since it was the 3rd time I had used SG I bought Valbazen this time. [Having 31 in my flock it is much easier just to do it all at once in their feed for 5 days.]
    Thanks
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Dose for Valbazen (albendazole 113.6mg/ml) is 0.08ml per pound (20mg/kg) for one day and repeat in ten days. This dose will treat roundworms, cecal worms a large percentage of capillary worms, *maybe* some species of tapes, but it will not treat gapeworms, though I wouldn't worry about those. [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015
  5. getaclue

    getaclue Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Thank you Kathy. That explains it perfectly. While I am aware that different animals metabolize different medications at different rates sometimes, and dosages have to be adjusted to allow for it, that still seemed to be overkill, however, I didn't have all the facts, which you have so kindly supplied. Thank you, and to Dawg as well for your contributions on this subject. Yes, there is a lot of misinformation out there, but thanks to you guys, at least one more flock will be properly wormed, and healthier because of it.
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    You're welcome... I was quite surprised when I bought that book and saw the dosage differences between species. Amoxicillin is one that really made me look twice, it's way more than the cat dose, it's 125mg/kg *twice* a day!

    -Kathy
     
  7. Betsy57

    Betsy57 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    kg and mg are weight measurements, ml is liquid volume. So how can one convert kg into ml?
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    1kg of water is 1,000,000 ml, but I don't think that's what you mean.

    Give me an example of a medication you might want to use and I'll show you a formula for figuring out the dose.

    -Kathy
     
  9. Betsy57

    Betsy57 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Not trying to do a conversion. Just stating a fact. It is hard to convert a weight into a volume (liquid). kg and mg are measures of weight. Liquid medications are usually administered by ml (volume), not by weight. The pages you posted from the book indicate weight but the medicine doses being posted here on BYC is being given by volume (ml).
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    One ml of Valbazen has 113.6mg of albendazole
    One ml of Safeguard has 100mg of fenbendazole
    One ml of ivermectin paste has 18.7mg ivermectin
    One ml of Safeguard paste has 100mg of fenbendazole
    One ml of Corid liquid has 96mg amprolium
    One ml of Wazine has 17mg of piperazine
    One ml of invermectin injectable has 10mg ivermectin
    One ml of ivermectin pour on has 5mg ivermectin.

    To calculate the dose is *dead* simple if you know the proper dose for the species and the what the animal weighs.

    I will use ivermectin injectable and a 10 pound bird as an example.

    Weight of bird pounds (10), divided by 2.2 to convert to kg, times the recommended dose of 0.2mg per 1kg of bird weight (0.2mg/kg), divided by the number mg per one ml (10).

    10 / 2.2 x 0.2 /10 = 0.09ml of the injectable ivermectin for a 10 pound bird.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015

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