Transitioning from roofed to roofless run

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
87,610
105,474
1,727
SW Michigan
My Coop
Yeah, 2x4 would do too, 2x3 is just what I happened to have found on Amazon at the time. For knocking things down - snow or fallen leaves - I was thinking I could try going at it from underneath with the leaf blower :lol: May just spread it more than anything, but at least it would be fun!
Blower might work good, have seen it done here...
....and be funner...especially if you blow all the leaves into the neighbors yard :gig
 

PioneerChicks

Sunny-side up
Sep 4, 2019
2,260
10,051
557
Idaho
My Coop
I'm reading through this thread. Wishing you the best of luck!
Good idea. I'll double check with the commissioner just in case, and will look for something fast-growing to plant in the spring. I already have some English ivy and Virginia creeper nearby, maybe I'll direct them up the run walls.
Warning: don't use Virginia Creeper near chickens cause of they eat to many berries they can be poisoned. I learned this the hard way.
 

PioneerChicks

Sunny-side up
Sep 4, 2019
2,260
10,051
557
Idaho
My Coop
Maybe make several picnic tables to go with your patio umbrellas :)

I think the wire top is a good idea--it will absolutely keep the chickens from ever flying into the neighbors yard, and it will keep things like hawks, owls, and cats from getting into the run.

Putting the umbrellas inside the run is a good idea, too. That way they cannot blow away into someone else's yard. (They could blow against the inside of the run and get damaged, so you would still want to put them away if you're expecting heavy wind, but at least they won't go anywhere.)

For fast-growing vines, a few possibilities are cucumbers, squash or pumpkins (vining type, not bush type), some varieties of tomato plants, peas or beans (the tall or climbing varieties).

For longer-lived vines, I've heard that grapes are good too.
Grapes...chickens love grapes! I see you don't really want to use seasonal plants, but I would still recommend grapes. We have them growing in a couple different locations over our chicken yard. The chickens love them and will eat all in reach. And those they don't reach, you can eat yourself! Nothing like homegrown grapes...
 

K0k0shka

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
1,921
4,669
317
Boston Area, MA
My Coop
Grapes...chickens love grapes! I see you don't really want to use seasonal plants, but I would still recommend grapes. We have them growing in a couple different locations over our chicken yard. The chickens love them and will eat all in reach. And those they don't reach, you can eat yourself! Nothing like homegrown grapes...
Grapes are definitely on the "menu" for next year, but away from the chickens, so we can eat them ourselves :lol: I don't really want grapevines hanging off of the run structure though. They can get heavy and bring it down. And they need a lot of pruning and maintenance, which I won't be able to do on the roof with the wire mesh in the way.
 

U_Stormcrow

Songster
Jun 7, 2020
702
1,271
196
North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
Grapes are definitely on the "menu" for next year, but away from the chickens, so we can eat them ourselves :lol: I don't really want grapevines hanging off of the run structure though. They can get heavy and bring it down. And they need a lot of pruning and maintenance, which I won't be able to do on the roof with the wire mesh in the way.
Muscadine grow naturally all over my acreage - a Florida native varietal. Can confirm, even when they aren't bearing heavy fruit (and the natives don't), until the stalk grows thick and hardened somewhat, they can tear down most anything. I have mature oaks and hickory bent by the actions of grapes over many years.
 

K0k0shka

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
1,921
4,669
317
Boston Area, MA
My Coop
Muscadine grow naturally all over my acreage - a Florida native varietal. Can confirm, even when they aren't bearing heavy fruit (and the natives don't), until the stalk grows thick and hardened somewhat, they can tear down most anything. I have mature oaks and hickory bent by the actions of grapes over many years.
Yep, I've seen what they can do, too.
 

DesertGrrl

Chirping
Sep 24, 2020
163
293
96
Arizona
That's a no on the shade cloth, wire is okay but I'm hesitant to add anything dense because of snow load in the winter and fallen leaves in the fall (the run is underneath a massive 8-story maple tree that drops a truckful of leaves). Though maybe if I leave the leaves there, they can act as a "roof" and privacy screen all piled up there :lol:
Can you put Shade Cloth under the wire?
 

K0k0shka

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
1,921
4,669
317
Boston Area, MA
My Coop
Can you put Shade Cloth under the wire?
No, nothing overhead like that, and "no tricks" :lol: I ran a couple similar ideas by the building commissioner and he said something along the lines of "I see what you're doing and that's clever, but let's just be safe and say no".
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom