Turned into a Roo?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by AwlOrganikLizz, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. AwlOrganikLizz

    AwlOrganikLizz Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 22, 2014
    So this is my sweet, sweet Yeti. I posted him/her in this forum a few months ago, we came to the conclusion she was a she. But... I'm having doubts now that Yeti has matured a bit! What do you think now? About six months old, no crowing.

    Also, I have a confirmed rooster. Which, in the event Yeti is confirmed a roo I would be getting rid of the other. Because, I can't have two roosters with 9 hens, is this correct?

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    Yeti next to Boots, black silkie pullet. Same age. Big size difference.

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  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm sorry, but that is a rooster. A few of the signs are the streamers in the crest, large reddish comb, and spur development. I suppose this is an example of why Silkies are so hard to sex.

    And yes, you are correct. Two roosters is too much for 9 hens.
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sorry, but that is a rooster.
     
  4. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    X2 on both rooster and two roosters being too many for 9 hens. The recommended ratio is 1 rooster for every 10 hens as too many roosters will be very hard physically on your hens (especially as they mature more); over-breeding them, biting and plucking the feathers from their necks and backs, battering them, and potentially, seriously injuring them. Sometimes with gentle breeds, owners have been able to get by with fewer than 10 hens for each rooster, but since the only reason you really need a rooster is for breeding and since 1 rooster has no problem doing that with 10 hens, keeping too many roosters is just not worth the risk to your hens.
     
  5. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree he is a rooster, but I don't necessarily agree that 2 roosters is too much for 9 hens. It really depends on the breeds you keep, your set up, ect. For example, with my Silkies I have 2 roosters in with 7 girls (some laying hens, some still pullets). Everyone still has all of their feathers and they get along very well as a flock. Why do I keep 2 roosters in with my girls? Because I need them for breeding purposes, thats why. One is a Silkie so I can make more Silkies. One is a Sizzle so I can carry on with my Sizzle project. Another reason I keep more than one rooster? Just the other day I had 3 roosters in with those girls, and one was taken by a hawk. If I had only had one rooster, I'd now be searching around for one of the same quality as my previous rooster (and dealing with quarantine and all that good stuff, and I've been here before- it's a terrible place to be if you're a breeder) or starting over again with chicks to maybe get a rooster I'm happy with.
    Now, I'm not saying this type of set up will work for everyone, I'm just giving another point of view. Silkies are docile by nature, and it works for them (mine). Now, my flock of Japanese bantams? They have 1 rooster and it stays that way for a reason.

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    Last edited: Oct 14, 2014
  6. AwlOrganikLizz

    AwlOrganikLizz Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 22, 2014
    Thank you everyone!
     
  7. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    You're welcome.
     

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