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Vent Prolapse Goat Calcium drench Help!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by smithmj, Jan 18, 2015.

  1. smithmj

    smithmj Out Of The Brooder

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    Tractor Supply fails again. The only way I could buy liquid calcium is as the Goats Prefer Calcium Drench. I have spent some time now trying to find dosing for liquid calcium, and just can't find it. I have a flock of 20 and they empty their 2 gallon waterer in just over a day. So whatever I put in the water would be a one day dose. I have separated on hen with moderately bad prolapse, and have discovered another who looks to have an irritated vent, but no prolapse yet. I am treating the wounds the best I can and feel good about what I am doing, but I need dosage for the calcium, to help prevent further prolapse among my hens. How much calcium should a hen get each day?
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    You should offer oyster shell free choice. The hens will eat as much as they need, and there's no chance of accidentally overdosing them on calcium. Tractor Supply will carry fifty pound bags of it in the chicken section, or if they don't have any, if you ask they will get some in for you.
     
  3. smithmj

    smithmj Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes if they had been eating oyster shell all along, maybe this wouldn't happen, but they pick around it and will not touch it. Oyster shell is slow acting and will not help a hen who is already prolapsed. Thanks for replying though.
     
  4. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Are you sure it was a calcium deficiency that caused it? There are other causes, and generally the birds know if they need calcium and will eat it if necessary. I'd just be worried about overdosing them on the calcium, which can be fatal.
     
  5. smithmj

    smithmj Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm not positive it was lack of calcium, but I think it is a safe guess. They NEVER touch the oyster shell, and the ground has been covered in ice for a couple of months, so no foraging. I have found several doses for chickens, ranging from 50-500 mg calcium per kg. I went with 100mg per kg. I am estimating that one bird weighs about 1.5kg, so dose for the 20 in a one day waterer. I am hoping it is enough. I decided to error on the side of caution. I'm getting worried about cupcake. she is acting well, but the prolapse is hardening, and I haven't been able to get it to stay inside at all. It seems like it is turning to scab inside the tissue. I am thinking about antibiotics for her, hopefully she doesn't already have an infection, but better safe than sorry, I suppose. I had severely cut back her food and light, she is in my house in a cat carrier. She didn't lay an egg today. I am hoping that means she stopped and not that she is bound. I think she would be quite noisy if she was. She continues to just make her little chirpy sounds.
     
  6. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Poor girl, I hope she does okay! Have you tried using preparation H on it? That can help. If she's also still trying to lay, which can make it worse or prevent healing, you can keep her in the dark for a day or two to force a molt and get her to stop. Other causes could be obesity, underweight birds, poor diet, and if the bird has a tendency to lay really big eggs, so if the calcium doesn't help, it could be that they have a lack of nutrients right now because they can't forage, or maybe Cupcake lays really big eggs. If you have a vet nearby, or a wildlife rehabber or something, you might get them to stitch it back in. It usually only takes a stitch or two to get it to stay, so that would be an option if you could swing a vet visit - they can be pricey for chickens.
     
  7. smithmj

    smithmj Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks, I am doing all you have mentioned. the protrusion is starting to firm up and looks dark, like there is blood under the skin that is hardening. It will not stay in for more than a second or so. I have been using prep H. I can't afford a vet visit. I fear it could run a couple hundred. I am hoping we don't have to put her down. I am going to call and ask what they think though.
    She seems a good weight, lays average size blue eggs that weigh between a medium and a large, I have put her in the dark and cut food back a lot, hoping to stop her laying.
    I really appreciate all the advice, I'm hoping someone will mention something I hadn't read about yet!
     
  8. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Well good luck and keep us updated! I hope she does well. I had a hen prolapse once, and I put the prolapse back in and it stayed, but she died the next day, poor thing :(
     
  9. smithmj

    smithmj Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm sorry about that. They are more than just farm animals. Thanks for your help!
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I use 23% calcium gluconate for cattle at 100mg/kg orally every 12 hours.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015

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