Water Heaters!!!! Are they really worth it??

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by chickencrazy429, Sep 19, 2013.

  1. Hello, I've been looking into getting water heaters for my flock this year... I found this one on Stromberg's, but the price was CRAZY!! Here it is: http://www.strombergschickens.com/product/universal-electric-fount-heater/fount-heaters I need one that works with a plastic base, because plastic is what I have... Anyways-- looking at the prices I can't just go buying these willy-nilly, and I have two waterers, though I'm not sure I'll need two since my hens and pullets might be integrated by then, so we'll see.... So are they worth the price? And do they last long? Also, are there any cheaper deals that I can get??? Thanks a bunch!! -chickencrazy429
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    This is essentially the same as using a light bulb inside a cookie tin. I doubt you could spend more than $10 building a cookie tin heater. Just search cookie tin heater here on BYC. Dozens of threads on the subject.

    Those who can follow a YouTube or written details of building a cookie tin heater will spend $10 or less.
    Those who just operate a computer and whip out a credit card will spend $62.

    The choice is there for everyone.
     
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  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I liked Fred’s post. Clear and to the point.

    I don’t know where you are located, how cold your winters get, or how you manage your chickens. In the winter I use the black rubber bowls you can get at Tractor Supply. If they freeze I just turn them over and stomp the ice out or bang them against something, then refill them. If you have a sunny day and set them in the sun, they will stay thawed in the low 20’s. That doesn’t help on a cloudy day or if the waterer is inside a building.

    To me it is a low-tech solution that will not burn your coop down but it is not for everyone. Those rubber bowls last for years.
     
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  4. Ok, yes I've heard of those homemade ones... I also found this: http://www.amazon.com/Kitty-Tube-Voltage-Outdoor-Electric/dp/B00ATWNIS0/ref=pd_sim_petsupplies_4 It's like a heating pad, but since it's for cats would it not be appropriate for chickens?
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    The rubber bowls are terrific. For much of the early and late winter, they are all one needs. The mid winter, really cold snaps do require electricity and SAFETY is number One.

    Cleanliness and ease of cleaning is number two. Chickens are pretty famous for making just about anything filthy in short order.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2013
  6. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here is a cheap way to make a water heater. You can also add a thermostat so the heater only comes on when the temperature gets down to freezing. Or, you could just turn on the heater when it is cold and turn it off when it is warm enough for water to not freeze.

     
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  7. Soooo they aren't heated?? Or am I missing something here?
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    No they are not heated unless you put them in the sun. Then they are solar heated since they are black.
     
  9. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    I don't recommend this. Very dangerous. I'm the fire hazard police.

    Could very well have been the source of orgin of my fire that burned down my barn. It shocked us a few times, and the fire Marshall told us how dangerous this is.

    Products MUST be fire safe when you deal with water and electricity.

    Now having said that, this product is way too over priced. Just get the heated waterer from the farm store. Ours cost around $50.
     
  10. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Yes rubber bowls! That is a good way to go. The ice cube just slips out and nothing breaks.

    In between changing it up, they can eat snow and won't die from thirst between morning and dinner chores.
     

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