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Wazine and Eggs (worm medicine)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sparklee, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Ohhhdear, I think you misunderstood what the purpose for wazine is and what kind of worms it gets rid of. Chickens pick up and carry NUMEROUS types of worms. If a person has never wormed their chickens, I always recommend they use wazine first. Why? Because wazine gets rid of large roundworms only....it clears the way for using a broad spectrum wormer 10-14 days later. Why so long? To give time for the wormer to do its job, time to expel the worms, and time for the wormer to be expelled as well. If you give your chickens a broad spectrum wormer first without using wazine first, you could possibly kill your chickens. Why? You could possibly kill them with the dead worm overload clogging their system causing toxicity that'll kill them. Broad spectrum wormers such as safeguard,eprinex and all the ivermectins and other wormers kill many, if not all types of worms...therefore the worm blockage/overload. With the wazine, you are clearing out the most common type worm that chickens get (large roundworm)....reducing the wormload so that other worms can be passed.
     
    3 people like this.
  2. DaniLovesChickens

    DaniLovesChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You usually need to use 2 different types of wormers 14 days apart. Most people use Wazine first because of how it works - it paralyzes the worms. If you have a major infestation then you don't want to give them something that will get rid of all of the worms at once because that can actually clog up their systems as they try to expel them and kill the chicken.

    I used Wazine first, then used Eprinex. I hated to lose 2 weeks worth of eggs, but I figured that it was better than losing my chickens.

    Sparklee - I also don't recall seeing an apology to Dawg. If you have such a problem with these message boards, then don't get on here and ask a question.

    Speckledhen - Dawg helped me too![​IMG]
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Thanks Dani. I pretty much have been worming like this for about 5 years, even before I found this site lol. Yes, I hate tossing eggs as well and switched to eprinex myself recently. I started using valbazen a year ago and still prefer using valbazen, but I have a myriad of wormers I rotate with to prevent worm immunity. No apologies are necessary from the OP, probably had one of those days, I have them too on occasion. Yes I agree with you, Speckledhen always gives great advice on a variety of subjects. I always value her advice as well as from many others on here.
     
  4. Ohhhdear

    Ohhhdear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:OK... that's a lot more clear, thanks dawg! I think this should be in a hand-out sheet given to everyone who buys chickens for the first time. Sort of like the "how to take care of your new puppy" info given out by Purina, complete with a coupon for a bag of free feed. Or at least a "How and Why to Worm Your Flock" in the BYCF FAQ [​IMG]

    Should I just expect worms as I would a new kitten or puppy? I haven't seen any in their poop, they're not lethargic, coughing or off their feed and they're laying great. Does everyone just worm routinely, and if so, what season? Does a hard killing frost kill the worm eggs in the ground if present?
     
  5. southphoenixchick

    southphoenixchick Out Of The Brooder

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    I came across this the other day I thought the link might be helpful. http://www.mypetchicken.com/catalog/Chicken-Health/Wazine-17-8-oz-p528.aspx

    I bought a bottle and was going to worm my four remaining chickens after illness killed three of my girls. But I got home and read the bottle (stupid me should have read it at the store but the lady gave it to me and said to use it for chickens), and read not to use it on laying chickens. I've decided not to use it since I haven't got signs of worms and I read on another thread to use DE (which I also bought to use on the floor of their run and coop), apple cider vinager in their water, and a mash of ground pumpkin seeds and buttermilk. I don't know if I'm going to do all of these things at once but I'm opting for the natural solutions instead. Guess I wasted my money on the wazine.

    This is the thread where I read about the natural alternatives to chemical wormers. https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=36477
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:First of all, DE is useless as a wormer, even as a worm preventative. It is good for what it does, keeping things dry. It was given the name "food grade" because it was originally put in grain storage bins, such as corn...and DE was added to the grain to keep it dry from humidity which would cause the grain to rot, hence the name "food grade." DE is useless when wet. The innards of all animals including humans and chickens are wet, DE fails as a wormer. DE might prevent lice and mites through its drying out action, but not an infestation. Other natural wormers may be good preventatives; such as crushed garlic, pumpkin seeds, cayenne pepper....but they wont work against a worm infestation. You might never see a worm in poop. Why would a worm detach itself from its host if it is being fed? If you do see a worm in the poop, it's a sure sign of an infestation and no amount of natural wormers will kill them because thousands already infest your hens innards. That's when you need to use a chemical wormer to get rid of them. Worms steal nutrients from your hens, causing their immune system to weaken making them more susceptable for diseases to infiltrate and eventually kill them through a slow starvation caused by the worms. Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is not a wormer. It is an acidifier which helps in calcium absorption and lower gut PH to help with bacterial issues. I add it to my chickens water daily when I change it out. Save your wazine. When your chickens start acting lethargic, slacked off eating, drinking, egg laying or not at all...or see worms in their poop...you'll need the wazine you purchased. Dont fall into the DE deception and misinformation the producers put out, they are only out to make a sale. Take it from someone who fell into that trap years ago, it failed me as a wormer and it will fail you as a wormer. Been there, done that! https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=2525157#p2525157
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2010
    2 people like this.
  7. emjay

    emjay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 6, 2009
    old post I know.

    but, informative.

    the wazine. I am hoping stores here in canada have it.

    You treat with it, then treat again in 14 days right. So, I guess it's safe to say, to really not eat those eggs for a month then?
    can one at least scramble up and feed to the chickens, or would that be not a good idea either?
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:It would be called Piperazine in Canada. You can reworm them the 10th day minimum, for a total of 24 days withdrawal. I dont recommend feeding them back to your chickens, you'll be extending the withdrawal time. You can feed them to your dog(s) if you wish. Piperazine has no effect on dogs.
     
  9. emjay

    emjay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 6, 2009
    Quote:It would be called Piperazine in Canada. You can reworm them the 10th day minimum, for a total of 24 days withdrawal. I dont recommend feeding them back to your chickens, you'll be extending the withdrawal time. You can feed them to your dog(s) if you wish. Piperazine has no effect on dogs.

    thankyou !!
    so once I treat them, then treat on day 10-day 14 for the second round. How long is this treatment good for? when would I need to deworm again? Is this then good for 3 months, 6 months, a year ??
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Since you live in Canada, your soil isnt condusive for worms because the soil is usually too cold. You can worm most likely only once a year. However, if you ever see worms in their poop, or they start acting lethargic...not eating/drinking, not laying...that could be a sign that they might have worms and you'd need to worm them. Here where I live, I have to worm once a quarter. Our soil here is usually warm and moist, condusive for worms. Hope this helps.
     

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