What can I do... yolk not absorbed in hatchling **PHOTO**

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by kathyinmo, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Is there anything I can do? The hatchling is dragging around the unabsorbed yolk.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  2. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2009
    Charlotte, NC
    Don't worry--it's not uncommon. If the chick looks and acts normal otherwise, it will probably be just fine. Is it still in the incubator? If so, I would leave it alone rather than risk the rest of the hatch.

    But if it seems to be in trouble--for instance, if the cord keeps getting wrapped around its legs or if the yolk is dragging so much you're worried it might pull his intestines out (and it can happen), then I would very quickly remove him to the brooder. On the way, you should be able to pull a good bit of the yolk off--it will probably just sort of melt in your hand (gross)--and the lighter weight will make it easier for the chick to get around.

    The cord will dry up and drop off in a few days.
     
  3. AkTomboy

    AkTomboy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 21, 2009
    DJ, Alaska
    I hope it works for you I lost my lil one who had the same thing happen with it. Good Luck [​IMG]
     
  4. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Here is a picture. It is so big; is it toooo big to be absorbed or corrected? This is the only one in the bator, so I can leave it in there, if that will help.

    Thanks for the advise iamcuriositycat.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Charlotte, NC
    That looks all right, actually, to me. As long as it isn't getting tangled up or the yolk getting trapped or pulling on the chickie, I'd leave it in where it's warm and so that you don't risk compromising the rest of the hatch.

    How long has the chick been out? Does it seem to be gaining strength? I know some chicks that still have the yolk attached don't do well, but I had two ducks hatch out that way my first time hatching, and they both were fine (well, one died at a week old, but I don't think it was related--his yolk and belly button had dried up quite thoroughly by that time).

    Good luck!
     
  6. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    Do not move it to a brooder. The yolk sac will not absorb if it dries out and if it scrapes against things it can rupture causing the chick to bleed to death. It is not normal for that much yolk to be left after hatching but it does happen. If the chick isn't moving around too much wrapping it's lower half in a warm damp paper towel can keep the yolk wet and protected until the chick absorbs it. If it's moving too much it won't stay in wrapped up and there isn't much you can do but wait. Sometimes they survive and sometimes they don't. A few people have tied off ruptured yolk sacs with string to stop them from bleeding to death but that is difficult and whether it would help or cause harm at this point I don't know.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  7. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    This chick is very active, dragging this big ball around; all over the bator in there! I will just leave it be, and hope for the best.
    Thanks for all the help!
     
  8. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Even though being very active, it looks to me like the "bag" is getting dried out. I know I can't keep a wet paper towel on it, too active. Anything else?
     
  9. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    It may dry up, fall off, and be fine. You want to prevent that if possible because aside from the risk of rupture and bloodloss the chick won't get as much nutrients and blood as it would if it absorbed all the yolk. It should be given extra care to make sure it eats and drinks soon after it can be removed from the incubator. The only other thing you can do is raise the humidity really high if the other eggs have finished. If you have eggs still hatching though that will kill them and it still may not keep the yolk damp enough to absorb. If it can't absorb it then letting it dry out may be best. That should close off the blood vessels going between the chick and remaining yolk so that the chick won't bleed to death if something tears it.
     
  10. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Akane, you have been very helpful. Thanks so much for responding!

    This is only my 2nd attempt at hatching. The first was extrememly successful (27 of 30), this time is much less so. This is chick #8, out of 11. I have seen no movement from the other 3, and today is day 22. I have a staggered hatch, so will be moving more into the hatcher in a couple days. I will just leave these last 3, and the chick, and see how it goes.

    Chick #7 has splay legs, so I taped them up, and she is doing well already! I have slip proof shelf liner in there, so I dunno ...

    These chicks are from my Cuckoo Marans, "Rupert," the gentle giant roo, and his 2 hens, Laverne and Shirley. I love 'em, so sweet, so wanted more. My first batch was a bunch of eggs from the Farmer's Market, and a gal at work .... all just a barnyard mix. Boy what a variety that was. Really pretty birds. They went to an older lady that recently lost most of her chickens to a predator. She is absolutely thrilled with the variety.
    Thanks again!
    Kathy
     

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