What does it physically feel like to cut a chickens head off?

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Nov 27, 2012
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Is there any benefit to using a razor knife (boxcutter), for the jugular slit?
I started using those, figured fresh blade very sharp.
Blade is too small, longer one works better for jugular slit....long smooth stroke.
I do use one for other parts of the process tho, for the small sharp tip.
I also use a depreciated pair of bypass pruning shears for removing head and feet.
 

3KillerBs

Crowing
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
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I tried that once...FAIL...!

Maybe it’s just me, but I need a longer blade!
I started using those, figured fresh blade very sharp.
Blade is too small, longer one works better for jugular slit....long smooth stroke.
I do use one for other parts of the process tho, for the small sharp tip.
I also use a depreciated pair of bypass pruning shears for removing head and feet.
Thank you.

Once I got my birds undressed I used the same kitchen knives, scissors, etc. that I used when cutting up grocery store chickens and turkeys that I routinely buy whole and part out for later use.

I wrote this article a good while back about cutting up a chicken when I encountered a lot of cooks, even good cooks, who had never done it but always bought cut pieces.
 

HollyWoozle

Songster
Premium Feather Member
Jun 12, 2018
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Interesting topic - slaughter of poultry is something I have often wondered about myself. I would like to be able to confidently dispatch one of our flock if they were suffering but haven’t yet had to do it (my uncle lives next door and will do it for me but he doesn’t enjoy it of course and I feel bad asking).

The Humane Slaughter Association here in the UK suggests stunning followed by neck dislocation or bleeding as the most humane method for culling poultry. It advises against decapitation. I ~think~ it’s illegal to cull a bird without stunning them first, although the legislation goes on to say that the ‘stunning’ can actually be neck dislocation by hand (followed by bleeding). I think that’s unless it’s an emergency situation.
 
Feb 28, 2020
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I know it has to be done sometimes...but honestly I would never ever do it myself.
  1. Because I would not have the heart to do it❤🐔
  2. Because doesn't it seem so inhumane?!💔
  3. Ew. It would be🤮
I'd rather put a chicken to sleep via the vets with an injection or something. Which, I know, sounds silly and expensive but, if you had a chicken you loved so much it would probably make sense. This is just my opinion, no hate pls😊.
 

wantsomechicks

Chirping
Sep 3, 2017
41
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I will be dispatching my first mini-batch of CX in a few weeks. This info is so helpful. Does anyone have recommendations for a specific style/model/brand of knives/razors for slitting the neck and then butchering?
 

Florida Bullfrog

Songster
May 14, 2019
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I think a good sharpening system is most important moreso than the kind of knife. You want two or three razor sharp knives on hand. If one dulls, you have another right there without having to stop and sharpen.

I like belt sharpeners like Worksharp belt sharpeners for cheap knifes. For expensive knifes you ought to practice first or else the belt sharpener will eat the tip off.
 

DallasChickyMomma

Songster
10 Years
Apr 13, 2010
75
125
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East Texas
if you had a chicken you loved so much it would probably make sense
I would do it myself especially if it was a chicken I particularly loved. The most humane thing is to end their suffering as quickly as possible, and who's better to do it, the person who loves the chicken, in the place they call home, in familiar surroundings and no fear? Or after a scary car ride to the vet, in a place it doesn't know, by someone who it doesn't know, in fear? I understand the sentiment... but anthropomorphizing animals usually does them more of a disservice than good. No judgement from me at all though, and I mean it. We all have to do what we believe is best for our animals.
 

rosemarythyme

Crossing the Road
Jul 3, 2016
11,760
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I know it has to be done sometimes...but honestly I would never ever do it myself.
  1. Because I would not have the heart to do it❤🐔
  2. Because doesn't it seem so inhumane?!💔
  3. Ew. It would be🤮
I'd rather put a chicken to sleep via the vets with an injection or something. Which, I know, sounds silly and expensive but, if you had a chicken you loved so much it would probably make sense. This is just my opinion, no hate pls😊.
That sounds great but you don't always have the luxury of waiting for someone else to do it. My vet would be at a half hour drive even if they agreed to see the chicken and at best they've managed to shove us in at the end of the day's schedule to put down an animal.

Is it better to let a hawk attack victim, torn open with her guts spilling out, suffer an hour, just to wait for someone to come home to do the job for you, or to end it immediately yourself?

To me the greater kindness is the latter. I wasn't happy to do it but at least I knew I minimized her suffering as much as I could.
 
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