What does the flock do during attack on coop?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Lisa Wood, Jul 14, 2016.

  1. Lisa Wood

    Lisa Wood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am new to chickens. I have ten assorted breeds, seven weeks old, one accidental rooster. I have noticed when they are afraid they RUN to the farthest corner of the threat, freeze, and stay very quiet. I am thinking of purchasing a baby minder for night time. My question is, if some predator starts to break into coop, will chicks get loud? Or will they do the silent/freeze behavior?
    We continue to predator proof, as they are all named and loved and snuggled.
     
  2. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    They are likely to panic and make noise once an attack is imminent.

    Ct
     
  3. Rock Home Isle

    Rock Home Isle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Go out to the coop at night when the girls are roosting for the night. Grab a bird off the roost and see what response is from the flock...almost nothing, maybe a little chattering.

    For the first few attacks, the birds will just sit and watch. This is why they are so vulnerable during night on the roost. Then as attacks continue, the flock will gradually become more and more alarmed. Some will try to escape, a few might escape....

    The ones that are being attacked are the ones making all the noise. With a small backyard flock, it's over pretty quick. Larger flocks will make more noise as the flock gradually becomes alarmed as the attacks continue.

    Ask people who've had their birds attacked or stolen..."We really didn't hear very much at all." A statement I've heard many times.

    Guard dogs are nice. Our dogs have woken us twice to let us know of ...issues in the coop.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2016
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  4. Lisa Wood

    Lisa Wood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Guard dogs would be cool. Too bad my shepherds are in the house sleeping on dog or human beds! I think we are getting less worried the more reinforcementsv we do. We are trying to "layer" anti-predator devices and construction.
    Knock on wood, I think the aerial predators are oblivious chickens are on oroperty since run is covered.
     

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