What is going on?!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ALong12, May 23, 2019.

  1. ALong12

    ALong12 Songster

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    Every week or every other week I’ve got more chicks developing coccidiosis:he it’s not because they’ve been exposed to it because these are individual chicks in completely seperate pens
    I have never!!! had to use corid until this year & I’m at my wits end
    What could be causing this crap?!?!:barnie
     
    BarnhartChickens98 likes this.
  2. Henriettamom919

    Henriettamom919 Songster

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    Did you have an unusually mild/wet winter? Have you had a lot of rain recently? Apparently infestation can spring up in the yard if these environmental factors occur.

    Are they on medicated starter? If not, I'd do that for your remaining healthy chicks!

    That is so frustrating! :hugs
     
    BarnhartChickens98 likes this.
  3. BarnhartChickens98

    BarnhartChickens98 Crowing

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    It is usually caused from them eating their own poo, either from the waterer or just being curious. where did you get the chicks? is it possible they got it there?
     
    puffypoo and Henriettamom919 like this.
  4. ALong12

    ALong12 Songster

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    yes mild/wet winter & yes always buy medicated chick starter

    very frustrating so im to the point dull i just start culling or keep buying $20 bottles of medicine :(
     
  5. ALong12

    ALong12 Songster

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    most of my chick Incubate & raise myself

    I had to cull 4 this morning I bought from TSC 2 months ago that went from completely normal to deathly sick over night :hit
     
  6. Henriettamom919

    Henriettamom919 Songster

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    I'd maybe consider it but give this post some time. I'm sure others here can help with near eradication measures and get you back on track!

    I'm so very sorry :hugs
     
    ALong12 likes this.
  7. BarnhartChickens98

    BarnhartChickens98 Crowing

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    I'm so sorry to hear, the only other thing i can think of is are you sure It's coccidosis and not something else?
     
    Henriettamom919 likes this.
  8. ALong12

    ALong12 Songster

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    im pretty positive
    i’ve researched, sat and watched
    nothing matches 100% & coccidiosis does :idunno
     
    BarnhartChickens98 likes this.
  9. Henriettamom919

    Henriettamom919 Songster

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    Plus, it spreads like wildfire! What's your setup? Are your chicks in brooders in a coop? How close are your groups of chicks to each other?
     
    BarnhartChickens98 likes this.
  10. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    I'm so sorry you are having so much trouble. I agree, having a bit more info on your set up will help in getting you some suggestions. Coccidia are everywhere, your environmental conditions may have set up for a 'bloom' in which case the numbers increase drastically. They are also very easily transported from place to place, pen to pen, brooder to brooder, on clothing and shoes. It's why commercial operations have such strict rules for those entering multiple buildings and pens, they utilize disposable shoe covers, multiple coveralls, and pans to step in to try to minimize transfer. Medicated feed contains a very low 'preventative' dose, but it won't treat an actual outbreak. I would treat all of your young birds at the same time since you are having so much trouble. Once they have recovered you should see a decrease as they build resistance. But any new chicks brought in or hatched will be at risk again. The coccidia can persist in the environment for a very long time. Make sure your pens are dry and as clean as possible, and feeders and waterers are kept clean and free of droppings. If they are ground level, raise them up on bricks or similar so they are less easily pooped in. Dirty feeders and waterers and wet/damp conditions are prime for spreading the infection.
    This is a very good thread, with video, on coccidiosis. It's geared toward commercial operations, but the info still applies.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/coccidiosis-video-worth-watching.1262022/#post-20259051
     

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