What is the best way to put a cat to sleep?

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redhen

Kiss My Grits...
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11 Years
May 19, 2008
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The Chickens' Maid :

Thanks for all the replys; we put him down minutes after I posted this topic. He went very peacefully, just fell asleep. He was in a lot of pain, and needed to be put down immediately. It's done now, and he is in a better place. I read all the posts on here, and I wanted to say thank you to everyone who suggested taking him to an organization to put him down; I completely understand and agree. Unfortunetaly, even though we may have been able to do that, it would not have been the most peaceful ending for him; he was in enough pain that it became a situation in which he needed to be put to sleep as quickly as possible. We love our animals and did not want to see him suffer any longer than was absolutely necessary.
This is a very difficult time for us; thank you again, everyone, for replying.

Thankfully he went down peacefully...
How was it done?​
 

Akane

Crowing
11 Years
Jun 15, 2008
4,654
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I remember during vet class, the quickest way is to fill up a huge stringe of air (we were doing horses), pop it in their jagular vein, and down they go. It was very quick.

I found air embolism and carbon dioxide poisoning are 2 of the methods most commonly considered inhumane by veterinary schools unless the animal is sedated before hand. Drowning and freezing are also right up there. I was kind of surprised at how few consider blows to the head prior to bleeding out or another method as unacceptable. Although I've never been a fan of it. Getting knocked unconscious hurt like hell when it happened to me.​
 

TriciaHowe

Mother Hen
11 Years
Nov 11, 2008
2,351
10
191
Trenton, FL
The Chickens' Maid :

Thanks for all the replys; we put him down minutes after I posted this topic. He went very peacefully, just fell asleep. He was in a lot of pain, and needed to be put down immediately. It's done now, and he is in a better place. I read all the posts on here, and I wanted to say thank you to everyone who suggested taking him to an organization to put him down; I completely understand and agree. Unfortunetaly, even though we may have been able to do that, it would not have been the most peaceful ending for him; he was in enough pain that it became a situation in which he needed to be put to sleep as quickly as possible. We love our animals and did not want to see him suffer any longer than was absolutely necessary.
This is a very difficult time for us; thank you again, everyone, for replying.


Whatever the method was I am sure you had his best interests at heart and he is no longer in pain. You have my sympathies....​
 

rodriguezpoultry

Langshan Lover
11 Years
Jan 4, 2009
10,917
122
331
Claremore, OK
Quote:I found air embolism and carbon dioxide poisoning are 2 of the methods most commonly considered inhumane by veterinary schools unless the animal is sedated before hand. Drowning and freezing are also right up there. I was kind of surprised at how few consider blows to the head prior to bleeding out or another method as unacceptable. Although I've never been a fan of it. Getting knocked unconscious hurt like hell when it happened to me.

So is breathing in carbon dioxide...feels like you're breathing in fire. Your entire body burns when you inhale. I forgot to hold my breath in the CO2 chamber after a bird had been put down at the lab...
 

Cetawin

Chicken Beader
11 Years
Mar 20, 2008
13,752
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Quote:Well said.


re: injecting air into the jugular...that is BS! If you have an air compressor handy you might accomplish that.
 

KDOGG331

Release the Ferrets!!
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12 Years
Jan 18, 2008
36,013
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I am so sorry for your loss, any loss especially of a beloved family member or pet can be tough, we had to put our dog down last july (13 yr old yellow lab, could hardly get up anymore and was in pain so we felt it was the best thing for him), so i know how you feel, I am so sorry, but at least he went peacefully again, im so sorry.
 

theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium member
9 Years
May 11, 2010
30,148
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Very sorry for your loss. Humane euthansia for a beloved pet is a difficult decision to make. Having a pet for 17 years makes the decision even more heartbreaking. And it should be. Shows respect for the life that passed.
 

rcentner

Songster
10 Years
Sep 6, 2009
1,215
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161
Le Roy, NY
Quote:they should never use a intra cardiac injection, those m#)$( F#()$*%#)'s You need to go somewhere else.

I am sorry you have to let your beloved go, it's the right thing to do if they are suffering. Having a vet come to your home is the best, taking in into the vet is 2nd best and if all else fails either the humane society or and experienced rifle handler (with the guts to handle the task and do it right)
 
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