What is this in my eggbox?

Wezdin

Aspiring Chickenologist
Oct 28, 2018
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Manhiem, Pennnsylvania
So i found this in by egg box, I am not sure what it is, but the golf ball is in the picture for size comparison. should I be worried?
any feedback would help, thanks in advance.
 

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Wyorp Rock

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Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Sep 20, 2015
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Southern N.C. Mountains
So i found this in by egg box, I am not sure what it is, but the golf ball is in the picture for size comparison. should I be worried?
any feedback would help, thanks in advance.
Welcome To BYC!
If you still have it, can you cut it open to look inside:D
It looks to be Lash Egg which is Salpingitis. This is an inflammation/infection of the oviduct.
If caught very early, you may be able to treat your hen with antibiotics to help her along. A lot of times by the time you see this material, it can be quite advanced.
Do you notice if she has any swelling or bloat in the abdomen?

You can try Amoxicllin to see if that helps or if you have a vet that can prescribe you some medication that would be good.

https://the-chicken-chick.com/salpingitis-lash-eggs-in-backyard/
https://the-chicken-chick.com/causes-of-lash-eggs-salpingitis-by/
https://www.merckvetmanual.com/poultry/disorders-of-the-reproductive-system/salpingitis-in-poultry
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
7,127
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Consett Co.Durham. UK
Hi and welcome to BYC

It looks like it may be a bit of lash egg material. Can you cut it in half. If it has concentric layers like an onion, then it is a lash egg and you need to be concerned. Firstly try to ID the bird that laid it. She may have a slightly swollen area around and below her vent.... cupping your hand between the legs of birds that are roosting at night should make it easier to compare them and perhaps norrow it down. The suspect may have soiled butt feathers or even a slightly bald patch. Administration of antibiotics at the earliest possible opportunity is your main hope of saving the bird although it will usually take months for the bird to become fatally ill with Salpingitis which is what causes lash eggs.
You may not see any more material like this expelled. Often it builds up into a large mass inside the oviduct which the bird is unable to pass. The oviduct then gets stopped back until egg yolks released by the ovary have no where to go other than drop into the abdominal cavity.... internal laying. Eventually the body will be unable to tolerate the mass of egg material inside the hen and either it will cause organ failure or become chronically infected.
It is usually a disease that affects birds over 2 years old but it can affect younger ones. What part of the world are you in? Usually older birds will be moulting at this time of year in the northern hemisphere and they stop ovulating. This bird will probably still be ovulating to have passed this, so that might help you narrow it down. Ovulating birds will have a bright red comb whereas off lay birds will have a pale dry shrivelled looking comb.
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
7,127
8,756
556
Consett Co.Durham. UK
It is not contagious unless you keep drakes with your hens and they could possibly transfer it to other birds and/or be responsible for the salpingitis infection in the first place due to their different biology/physiology.
How old are your birds? Do you know which one passed the lash egg?
 

Wyorp Rock

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Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Sep 20, 2015
37,354
52,737
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Southern N.C. Mountains
Thanks! is this contagious ? or will it stick to one chicken? i am located in southern Pennsylvania.
That's a loaded question:)
If a flock has a history of respiratory illness like Mycoplasma or Infectious Bronchitis, it's not uncommon for multiple hens the same age to present with symptoms of Salpingitis over time. The Salpingitis in this particular scenario is not "contagious" in and of itself since it's initial cause was another illness - basically it's a latent symptom.
If the cause was E. Coli, Salmonella or Fowl Cholera, then yes, personally I would consider it contagious. https://www.merckvetmanual.com/poultry/disorders-of-the-reproductive-system/salpingitis-in-poultry
 

Wezdin

Aspiring Chickenologist
Oct 28, 2018
2,337
5,941
412
Manhiem, Pennnsylvania
My flock consists of 4 two and a half year old brown egg layers, one 4 year old brown egg layer, 4 6-month old RIRs, and 2 6-month old BSL. I do not have a history of sickness with the exception of a case of fowl pox
 

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