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What is too hot for a chicken?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by eastbaychicks, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. eastbaychicks

    eastbaychicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Livermore
    It has been in the triple digits this summer here in Cali and I'm wondering what is too hot. I'd be so sad to loose a chicken to heat. All tips relating would be great.
     
  2. JakRat

    JakRat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2009
    Dover
    Hello,
    My mom lives in Texas and she is having similar issues. She has brought them in the house, but finding a hen next to her in her bed in the morning was a bit much so now she makes sure they are in the shade, and if it is to hot to put fans on or near them... Mine like ice cubes in their water too...
     
  3. Eggs-Actly

    Eggs-Actly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2008
    Daytona - Florida
    what is too hot for a chicken?

    350° for 45 minutes! [​IMG]

    Sorry but I couldn't resist. I give them frozen watermelon or cantaloupe. they love it
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2009
  4. sfw2

    sfw2 Global Menace

    Quote:That's what I was going to say!

    Great minds!

    Sorry, eastbaychicks. Some of us just can't help ourselves. I second JakRat's suggestions, though. I've also put half-filled 2-liter bottles of water in the freezer, and put those in the coop.
     
  5. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

    Feb 3, 2009
    Hope Mills, NC
    As long as they have shade and water they should be fine. I gave my turkeys a box fan to circulate air, and they LOVE it, the chickens didn't like it though, I guess it was too strong for them?
     
  6. LittleFeat

    LittleFeat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 14, 2009
    I've seen some post here that you can put jugs of ice around for them to get near. Also some have misters in the run.....and Eggs-actly don't you dare say those are called roos! [​IMG]

    Eggs-Actly...you are tooo cruel.....that's what I was gonna say, too!
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    We are BAD, BAD, BAD!
     
  7. LittleFeat

    LittleFeat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 14, 2009
    By the way...Eastbay....I love your BYC page! great looking chicks, chickens, and yard!! [​IMG]

    oh and dog!!! and what a sweet girl too!
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2009
  8. HBuehler

    HBuehler Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 30, 2009
    Lebanon TN
    I was right with the other posters
    400 degrees is too hot they do much better at 350 [​IMG]
    Our chickens have fans big box fans inside and outside shade but on really hot days they love their fans.
     
  9. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Fans in the coop. Shade outside. Provide them with lots of fresh water. Frozen water in milk jugs placed around and shallow pans of water for them to cool their feet in. Cool the feet, cool the body.
    Keep activity level around the chickens to a minimum. Allow them to just lay around.
    Also, you can purchase poultry electrolytes to put in their water supply to help them cope.
     
  10. briteday

    briteday Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 16, 2008
    Northern NV
    As long as it is not too humid our birds seem to do just fine in the triple digits. We are in high desert and have about 4-5 weeks each summer with highs over 100. But the nights usually fall below 60.

    During the day we make sure they have access to shade and plenty of fresh water. We freeze water in yogurt cups and empty milk jugs. We use the yogurt container cubes to put directly into smaller waterers. And the milk jugs we use to cool the water in 5 gallon or larger containers.

    If it gets to be over 100 even in the coop (shady, has good ventilation, kinda breezy in the afternoon) then I turn on an oscillating sprinkler and let it run for about an hour in their pasture. They like the puddles while it's running and they like the wet dirt to dig holes to lay in when the sprinkler is turned off.
     

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