WHAT WOULD YOU DO?......

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by ksct, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. ksct

    ksct Songster

    459
    4
    131
    Apr 23, 2009
    upstate, NY
    I'VE READ SOME POSTS ON HERE ABOUT PEOPLE WORRYING ABOUT LEAVING THE CHICKS WHEN THEY GET THEM....
    WE SHOULD BE GETTING OUR 12 CHICKS (FINALLY!!!!!!) ON FRIDAY AFTER WORK. WE HAVE MADE A 'LAST MINUTE' TO TRAVEL A COUPLE HOURS DOWN TO PA TO VISIT THE IN-LAWS ON SATURDAY. WE'LL BE LEAVING ABOUT 8-9AM AND WILL BE GONE MOST OF THE DAY MOST LIKELY INTO THE EARLY EVENING. MY QUESTION IS, WILL THEY BE OKAY FOR THAT LONG? SHOULD BE POSTPONE??? IF THEY'RE A DAY OR TWO OLD ON FRIDAY, DO THEY STILL NEED THE HEAT LAMP ON THEM. DH IS AFRAID WE'LL 'COOK' THEM WHILE WE'RE GONE. THUS FAR THE TEMPERATURES ARE PREDICTED TO BE ABOUT 75 AND RAIN. WE WILL BE KEEPING THE CHICKS IN THEIR BROODER INSIDE THE COOP ITSELF. ANYONE HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS ON THIS SITUATION? I'M CONCERNED AS WELL ABOUT THEM BUT DO THEY REALLY NEED SUPERVISION THAT WHOLE DAY? THIS IS OUR FIRST BATCH OF CHICKENS AND WE'D BE DEVISTATED IF ANYTHING HAPPENED TO THEM THAT WE COULD HAVE PREVENTED! ANY AND ALL ADVICE WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATE!!!!!!

    THE LADY WE ARE GETTING THEM FROM IS ACTUALLY GOING TO HAVE HAD THEM @ LEAST ONE DAY IF NOT MORE. SHE KEEPS THEM FOR A DAY OR TWO TO WATCH THEM AND MAKE SURE THEY KNOW HOW TO DRINK AND MAKING SURE THAT THEY ARE. THAT'S WHERE I WAS UNSURE. WE CAN DEFINATELY HAVE SOMEONE CHECK IN ON THEM TOO. THE BROODER BOX IS VERY LARGE SO WE SHOULD KEEP THE HEAT LIGHT ON ONE SIDE OF IT ALL DAY LONG?
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2009
  2. The Wolf Queen

    The Wolf Queen Songster

    3,003
    42
    211
    May 2, 2009
    Albuquerque, NM
    Id say postpone your visit. I like to watch mine for 3-5 days as a safety. Some times longer.
     
  3. chickenwhisperer123

    chickenwhisperer123 Whispers Loudly

    2,542
    17
    181
    Mar 7, 2009
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    They need a supplemental heat source for longer than 2-3 days.

    I have read many times that you start at 95 degrees and reduce the temp by 5 degrees each week, until it is no longer needed.

    Can you find someone to check on them while you are gone?

    Good Luck!!
    Jason
     
  4. Omran

    Omran Songster

    Jul 26, 2008
    Bagdad KY
    Quote:I agree, or find a very good trusted friend to take care of them that day.
     
  5. TXmom

    TXmom Songster

    I would postpone if possible. Any number of things can go wrong or need to be "adjusted" in those first few days. They need approx. 90 degrees for the first week, so 75 would definitely be too cold for them. Then they'll pile up on each other to stay warm, and possibly crush or suffocate each other. If you leave a light on, unattended for the first time, it could get too hot and dehydrate them. Things need time to get adjusted just right.

    There's also the possibility of a weak, stressed (from shipping) or sick chick. They need to be watched carefully the first few days and treated if necessary.
     
  6. ksct

    ksct Songster

    459
    4
    131
    Apr 23, 2009
    upstate, NY
    OK. THE LADY WE ARE GETTING THEM FROM IS ACTUALLY GOING TO HAVE HAD THEM @ LEAST ONE DAY IF NOT MORE. SHE KEEPS THEM FOR A DAY OR TWO TO WATCH THEM AND MAKE SURE THEY KNOW HOW TO DRINK AND MAKING SURE THAT THEY ARE. THAT'S WHERE I WAS UNSURE. WE CAN DEFINATELY HAVE SOMEONE CHECK IN ON THEM TOO. THE BROODER BOX IS VERY LARGE SO WE SHOULD KEEP THE HEAT LIGHT ON ONE SIDE OF IT ALL DAY LONG?
     
  7. TXmom

    TXmom Songster

    Yes, that sounds good. As long as they can move toward the heat if they're cold, and away from the heat if they're warm, then they should be good. [​IMG] Make sure the heat lamp is very secure. And put the food and water a little ways away from the lamp.

    If the lady is keeping them for a couple days anyways, could she just hold them until Saturday evening, or Sunday morning? Just an idea....
     
  8. Kait27

    Kait27 Songster

    103
    11
    119
    Apr 30, 2009
    Central Massachusetts
    I wouldnt say they need constant supervision, but frequent checkings-on. Have you read chick raising 101 on the Learning Center of this page? It might give you some tips about heat.

    I got my first batch (ever) of chicks on Monday evening. I made sure to test the light on the brooder in advance so I knew exactly where I needed it to get it at 95°. I also pre-heated the brooder while I went to get the chicks. They need supplemental heat for probably the better part of a month to six weeks, depending on where you live and how warm it is. (I am in New England and we're still in the 50's). Start at 95° and decrease by 5° each week. They shouldn't be at 75° until they are 4 weeks old. They don't need the light once they are fully feathered, or the temperature of the light is the same as room temp (or air temp outside. I am brooding in the house.)

    When we arrived home, I set them up in the brooder, watched them for a bit and went to bed. I knew the light was going to maintain the temp reliably. Got up in the morning and added food and changed the water, and changed the paper towels they are on. I work full time, but my mom is in and out through out the day. She checks in on them, but they never need anything. The brooder should be large enough that they can regulate their temp by moving closer to farther away from the light- shine the light in one corner. This will be the "warm" spot, and they will find a place that is comfortable. You wont cook them if they can go on the other side where its cooler. My light has never been turned off, even at night, and probably wont for a long time. They need heat all the time. I agree with what the others said, being brand new you might want to keep an eye out for illness, etc. If you have a neighbor or someone who can just make sure that the temperature is stable (or adjusting the light if necessary) and they aren't doing anything wacky, you should be fine. Make sure your light is stable and can't fall, either into the brooder or on the ground next to it. I use a clamp-on dome reflector light clipped to the top of the brooder (i'm using an old guinea pig cage). i put a caribiner hook on the clamp and cage just to hold the light if the clamp should let go. A light that hot that falls into shavings can start a fire.
     
  9. ksct

    ksct Songster

    459
    4
    131
    Apr 23, 2009
    upstate, NY
    wow thank you all for the advice! it was mostly what i expected. i'm just nervous because it's the first time we've EVER had them. Not to mention we were supposed to get them over a month ago....
    i've read books and checked in on BYC frequently, one because it's addicting and 2 because the info is GREAT! love how everyone is kind of a family on here!
    We will DEF be turning the lamp on before we pick them up. I hadn't thought of that until that advice from Kait27. DH is luckily off tomorrow so I will have him turn it on early. we're supposed to go get them when i get home from work. taking the little man with us. HE's 7 and soooooo excited!!!!! [​IMG]
    well we all are! [​IMG]
     
  10. columbiacritter

    columbiacritter Songster

    1,602
    20
    194
    Jun 7, 2008
    Scappoose Oregon
    Guess I'm not that much of a worrier. I set my brooder up at least 3 days in advance to make sure all is in working order then just watch the babaies intently for the first 6 to 8 hours. After that they all seem to either be ok or I've moved some into isolation where I can watch them better, but that's rare.

    I work far from home so depending on the day I get my chicks by the next day they are completely unspurervised for about 10 hours a day. When I am home I can check them periodically, but they are not in the living area of my house so they aren't watched constantly.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: