When a duck loses their companion

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by meimei42, May 26, 2012.

  1. daisymygirl

    daisymygirl In the Brooder

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    Sep 8, 2015


    we don't know but Daisy died today sad face :( :(:(
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2015
  2. daisymygirl

    daisymygirl In the Brooder

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    So first I found Alpha in a pool and he was upside down dead but then his girlfriend Daisy had became this dressed and depressed about him dining then
    she would walk slow and she can move behind me others and she would isolate herself from the other but today she was in my lap and something came out of her but it was like a yellowish white liquid and then I had put her down in her legs what it well she couldn't walk and then I'll check to see if she still couldn't walk so I picked up her head moved way back in like a circle and then she died in my arms I can't get over it I can't stop crying
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2015
  3. Amykins

    Amykins Crowing

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    What?? OMG, what happened?!

    Edit: You posted while I was typing. Oh no, honey, I'm so sorry...you don't think there's an illness spreading through your flock, do you?
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2015
  4. Cred

    Cred In the Brooder

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    Oct 31, 2015
    I am new to keeping ducks myself but have made some observations and done much research before I got our ducks. We have 6 ducks about 9months old that have been raised together since hatch day. Originally we had 8 but lost 2 to a raccoon, in separate incidents. We were heartbroken, our remaining ducks, who were present for the abductions and must have been terrified at the time, didn't seem the least bit bothered by the losses.
    Ducks are social animals and we find they don't do anything separately- all actions are conducted collectively. One gets up to go forage, they all get up and go, too. One wanders to a shady spot and nestles in to nap and they all follow suit. Very social birds, much happier in a group.
    That said, ducks do not mate for life like geese. In the wild you will see geese parents raising their young together and will continue to raise goslings with that same mate. Ducks on the other hand will only bond for a season and you will see the female duck raising her ducklings alone. The male will find another mate the following year during mating season.
    They only form temporary attachments that should make them better adjusted if a loss occurs. That said, don't leave them alone. They are happier and feel more secure with another duck. Hope that's helpful.
     
  5. ThreeBs

    ThreeBs Hatching

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    Apr 30, 2013
    I am so sorry. Yesterday, our chickens killed our Aprille, who was protecting her egg. She laid it outside of her normal spot. They pecked her to death. We were home at the time and never heard anything out of the ordinary, no alarm. We are heartbroken. They'd lived in the same large area for a year without incident. We had said when the chickens were done laying, we'd not have another chicken flock and stick with ducks because we loved these girls so much. They were a mothers day gift three years ago - less than 24 hours old when I got them from a local farm. (He doesn't breed ducks anymore) We raised them. They were lovely, like puppies. I rehomed the chickens within minutes after figuring out what happened. Now, we have a very lonely Maye. She's despondent. Sad little soft quacks. Pacing around the area she was killed. I'm having trouble finding any Welsh Harlequins in my area now. Aprille was alpha duck. Maye was her loyal follower, the smaller and more ladylike of the two. I don't know what to do! I would pick up a duck today if I knew where to kind one. :(
     
  6. Cred

    Cred In the Brooder

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    oh, threeBs, so sorry to hear about Aprille. We, too, have welsh harlequins (they're my favourite) but we love all our ducks.
    I do hope you find a companion for Maye, soon.
     
  7. ThreeBs

    ThreeBs Hatching

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    Apr 30, 2013
    Well, we now have two tolddlers and an young adult Dutch Hookbill. Maye is wary, but they follow her around anywhere. She's definitely lead duck. She kinda nibbles at the the little ones when they don't leave her alone. Poor little things, but she's not offensive, just guarding her personal space. However, they are all successfully bunking down in the bunkhouse together. Still miss my Aprille. I loved how she and Maye would run over to the fence and wiggle and quack when I came home. The new group is finding their rhythm. I hope they all make it. I don't think I could bear another death. I hope Maye will eventually form a bond. Seeing the three separate from her is almost more painful than seeing her alone. Is she grieving? *sigh*
     
  8. Winniethepekin

    Winniethepekin Hatching

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    Sep 5, 2016
    Washago, Ontario
    Hello everyone,
    I have a similar story. My family got two ducklings and they were very attached to each other. Sadly, the pen was attacked in the night and one was taken. They were too young then for me (very new to ducks) to know if they were male or female. This was about 2 weeks ago. Now, I'm fairly certain my lone duck Winnie is female and is about 5-6 weeks old. My husband and I are planning on getting another duck as a companion for Winnie as she is clearly lonely - so my question is do I get a male or a female duck? Which would she likely bond with better? I am looking for one approximately the same age. Thank you I advance for any suggestions.
     
  9. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners

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    I feel it's like introducing anyone - it is up to them how well they get along. There are things we can do to help, though.

    Sometimes a one male-one female pair works out really well. But sometimes one female will get way too much mating from the drake, and a general rule of thumb is three or more females per male. So ponder that, go with your instincts.

    Introduce them slowly. Let them see each other, but keep fencing between them at first. Sometimes things click right away, sometimes not. Have treats ready so they can both enjoy them at the same time, maybe associate good things with being together. Once they seem to be at least neutral toward one another, give supervised time together. A little poking or chasing is okay - more than that, time out and try again another time.

    Meanwhile an unbreakable mirror could give her some solace.
     
  10. Duck-Everest

    Duck-Everest Hatching

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    Oct 13, 2016
    This morning I went out to let my ducks out of their pen for the day (we have to keep them enclosed at night because we have coyotes) and found one of my ducks, Puddles, dead. My other duck Everest seems to be fine, she is eating and drinking okay and she was in her pool twice today. Will she be okay without another duck? Currently there is a stuffed animal in the pen too just so she would have something with her. She has never been outside by herself before.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2016

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