WHEN TO DEWORM-PROPHYLACTICALY OR AS NEEDED?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bwebb7, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. bwebb7

    bwebb7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 16, 2008
    Brooksville, Fl
    I posted this on the heading...
    I have a flock of 20 hens hatched May 16th. I treated them with Piperazine when they were 6 weeks old. (I always wormed puppies at regular intervals) I haven't started to get eggs yet-though soon I'm sure.
    What I want to know is should I go ahead and Ivermectin them before they start to lay or just treat as needed?
    I hate to think they are walking around with parasites. I would think they could decline quickly?
     
  2. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    Worming every 6 months is ok if you get the right kind of ivermect and only give them a small amy and dont eat the eggs for a couple of weeks after (of course yours arent laying yet)
     
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Believe it or not, a healthy bird can carry a small worm load with no problem. It's when it gets out of hand that you see them become droopy with weird poop, etc. I did not worm my flock till they were two years old and then again when they were close to three, and the only reason I did it is that I did see a worm in one rooster's poop. If you use natural worm preventatives, you may never see a worm load that needs chemicals. Also, its been proven that freeranging chickens do tend to eat plants and other things on range that are natural wormers as well.
     
  4. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Case in point: I had a chicken to the vet about 2 months ago. She's about 1 1/2. While on the trip up, she pooped in the carrier, so I had a nice (?) fresh one to ask the vet to check. She did a fecal, and it came back completely negative. I've got 7 others in that pen, have had them since day-olds, and not a worm one! [​IMG]

    I do understand when folks worm occasionally, just to be safe, but it's a personal choice. I'm with Cyn; I won't do it unless I see evidence to tell me I need to. You need to do what makes you feel comfortable.
     
  5. bwebb7

    bwebb7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 16, 2008
    Brooksville, Fl
    Yeahhhh! I did not relish the idea of 21 little drops on these birds!
    What are some "natural wormers"?
    Would that be DE?
    They don't get to free range too much-(2 hours daily) until my run is complete.???
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2008
  6. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Sep 25, 2007
    Michigan
    ACV (apple cider vinegar) with the "mother" in it (you can get it at health food stores - it will have debris in the bottom) is apparently known to keep the worms away, if you don't already have an infestation. If you do a search on here for ACV, you'll find a ton of info. on it.
     

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