When to give up?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PouletPlaza, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. PouletPlaza

    PouletPlaza New Egg

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    Dec 7, 2011
    We have been doctoring a rooster for over two weeks with a severe ear infection. I took him to an avian vet and we have been giving him Metacam and Baytril orally and some ear drops along with cleaning out the ear. He is in a big cage in our house so we can monitor him. His head is still totally upside down, but he will eat and drink if I hold him in my lap and put the bowl under his beak. We have put over $250 in this chicken (I know, I'm crazy!) and, although he is still living, he doesn't seem much improved. His comb seems to be shrinking and the other side of his face is just now swollen. Should I just call it quits and put him out of his misery? (He's our pet now and that's so hard to do!) This current round of meds will probably last about another week. It's gone on so long now, I would rather him die on his own or get better!!! Help, anybody? Thanks.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Welcome to BYC. Sorry this is happening. The facial swelling is mostly likely caused by a respiratory disease and the baytril isnt helping. Most respiratory diseases are contageous. I recommend that you cull him and sanitize everything he came in contact with. Diseases can be carried on your clothes, waters, feeders etc...you dont want this disease speading to your other birds. I recommend that you read up on biosecurity. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011
  3. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    [​IMG] I wish it was under better circumstances.

    I have to agree with Dawg on this one. I would opt to have him put down. You have gone above and beyond trying to save this bird, but there comes a time when you must concede defeat. It sounds like he is simply not going to come out of this. He will also likely be a carrier of whatever he has even if he should survive, which mean any new birds you bring in will be at risk. Did the vet test him to find out what the causative agent was for this disease? If not, then I would ask the vet to do so. You really need to know what is causing this illness to protect the rest of your flock and any future birds you may bring in. If you have the vet euthanize the bird then the body can be sent for necropsy to establish what he has/had.

    Sorry you are going through this.
     

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