Where do I find finisher feed for turkeys?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by natyvidal, Nov 5, 2019.

  1. natyvidal

    natyvidal Songster

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    Hi everyone. I have five turkeys, Narragassett breed that are earmarked for thanksgiving dinner. This is my first time raising turkeys so I have been reading a lot. One thing I read is to feed them “finisher” feed. I can’t find that in the internet or stores. Is it a omething I just buy? Or simply give them a lot of carb veggies during the last weeks? Will “all stock feed” work the same way? I use that for my donkey and goats. Or is there a recipe for me to blend to give them.
    Thank you for your help.

    Also, in today’s market how much should I sell the turkeys for? Should there be a processed price and one for unprocessed? I’ve seen them go for $85 at the supermarket. Mine are free range all natural turkeys. Born April 28. I live in Florida. This like a test run this year. If there is high demand for mine I’ll have more next year.
     
  2. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    A quick Google search shows at least 5 different companies making a Turkey Finisher feed.

    "Finisher" feed is not required. Just feed them a high fat diet. Many finish their turkeys feeding mainly corn for the last month before processing.

    Of course, if you put your turkeys on a finisher feed it will invalidate your "free range all natural turkeys" claim.

    Live unprocessed turkeys sell for a different price than processed turkeys.

    Check for similar threads in the Meat Birds ETC forum.
     
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  3. FredsGobblers

    FredsGobblers Songster

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    I would think tractor supply or rural king or most feed stores would carry a finisher feed. It is 22% protein. I usually feed mine a heavy corn diet for the last 6 weeks to put a lot of fat on the frame.
    The market can be quite different in any location. I have seen them go for $50 to over $100 depending on if you are talking about live or processed. You will just have to test your market area. Remember you can always lower your price.
     
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  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Crossing the Road

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    The primary difference between feeds is crude protein %(other than layer with high calcium content).
    All flock is usually 18 or 20% protein. Finisher is lower than that and normally about 15%
    I've seen finisher at several feed stores. Perhaps the ones near you just don't carry it. Call or visit them and ask the manager if they could order some for you. Most manufacturers make a 15% but stores don't stock it because the demand is low. They want food on the shelves they can sell before it is stale.
    In a pinch, you can continue to feed the all flock feed and add some grain to cut the crude protein in the aggregate.
     
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  5. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    Tractor supply has a meat bird crumble that is by Nutrena. I use this one for all my meat birds and it is working great. You can use it from day old all the way to the night before you process them (unless you feed them the day of, we don't).
     
  6. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Crossing the Road

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    Meat bird feed is usually 22 or 23% protein and isn't really appropriate for turkeys after about 15 weeks.
    It can work for chicken broilers but they are usually slaughtered by 8 weeks.
     
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  7. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    I was told to use it by the farm for all birds. I'll look more into this. I was told to do 20% or more for protein.
     
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Crossing the Road

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    You were told by what farm? They raise birds but are they poultry nutritionists?
    For mature chickens, 20% or more is excessive. Their bodies just don't need it and can't use it. That excess must be processed by the liver and kidneys and ends up as ammonia in the feces/bedding. Excessive protein through adulthood can cause gout.
    There is more on the topic in the Avian Clinical Biochemistry section of the following link.
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/visceral-gout

    An in depth look at protein requirements of various ages of poultry.
    https://extension2.missouri.edu/g8352
     
  9. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    Thanks for the info. I'm not into debates.
     
  10. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    Meat Bird feed is not appropriate for young turkey poults. It does not have the proper amounts of lysine, methionine and niacin that is best for turkey poults.
     
    ChickenCanoe likes this.

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