Wyandotte

Average User Rating:
4.13008/5,
  • Breed Purpose:
    Dual Purpose
    Comb:
    Rose
    Broodiness:
    Frequent
    Climate Tolerance:
    Cold
    Egg Productivity:
    Medium
    Egg Size:
    Large
    Egg Color:
    Brown
    Breed Temperament:
    Friendly,Easily handled,Calm,Bears confinement well,Quiet,Docile
    Breed Colors/Varieties:
    Golden laced, silver laced, colubian, buff, partrige, silver penciled, blue, and blue laced red
    Breed Size:
    Large Fowl
    APA/ABA Class:
    American
    LL.jpg

    The Wyandotte aka American Sebright, were developed in the United states in the 1870’s, in and around the New York area. The first color developed was the Silver Laced variety and they were originally called American Sebrights. The name was changed to Wyandotte (after the indigenous Wyandot people), when they were admitted into the APA in 1883. They were exported to Europe around the same time.

    Wyandottes are a calm breed in general and have very nice temperaments. They are good with people and generally get along well in a mixed flock. They are decent foragers, though they do not tend to wander far and are not good flyers. They are extremely cold hardy. The hens are good layers of light brown eggs, good winter layers, will set, and are good mothers. The cockerels make a good table bird. Today they are an extremely popular dual purpose breed and very popular among small flock owners looking for a colorful winter layer.

    They have a flat rose comb and bright red face. Today they come in many feather colors and patterns, with over thirty found in Europe, the beautiful Blue Laced Red and Silver Laced are probably the two most popular colors in general. They are very popular as exhibition birds. Many breeds have been used to produce the Wyandotte we know today, including Brahma, Cochin, Hamburg, and Plymouth Rocks. They are also found in bantam size.

    It was removed from The Livestock Conservancy's Priority list in 2016 and is no longer considered endangered.

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    Wyandotte egg

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    Wyandotte chick

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    Wyandotte juvenile

    LL trio.jpg
    Wyandotte rooster and hens

    For more info on Wyandottes and their owners' and breeders' experiences, see our breed discussion here:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/chicken-breed-focus-wyandotte.1135563/
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    Chicken Breed Info:
    Breed Purpose:
    Dual Purpose
    Comb: Rose
    Broodiness: Frequent
    Climate Tolerance: Cold

    General Egg Info:
    Egg Productivity:
    High to Med
    Egg Size: Large
    Egg Color: Brown

    Breed Temperament:
    Friendly,Easily handled,Calm,Bears confinement well,Quiet,Docile

    Breed Colors / Varieties:
    Golden laced, silver laced, colubian, buff, partridge, silver penciled, blue, blue laced red, black
    Breed Details:
    Wyandottes are very good egg layers even in winter! they make a good table bird, and a dressed Wyandotte is nearly proportional to a modern Cornish rock X. the most common colors of Wyandottes are Colobian and silver laced. Wyandottes are often showed, they make up most of the bantam clean leg class at shows! wyandottes are very docile and mellow, my 5 week old will fall asleep in my hands if i pick her up! she is soooooo friendly! she loves to be pet! i HIGHLY recomend this breed!

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    Rooster
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    Hen
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    Egg
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    Chick
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    Adolescent
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Recent User Reviews

  1. cluckmecoop7
    4/5,
    "Great birds"
    Pros - Very pretty, good layers, pretty friendly
    Cons - They are a little hard to catch and a bit skittish.
    These are good birds. They are a little hard to catch but are very nice.. still. I have three, one is named Blamo, she is the friendliest of the 3. The others are named Dazzle and Melody. They are nice, but not as nice as Blamo. I also have 3 more chickens...Buffys. They are the best breed in the world!
    Purchase Price:
    3.00 each

    images

    1. DSCN8888.jpg
  2. Ausdudette
    5/5,
    "Silver Wyandotte"
    I had silver wyandottes a number of years ago & found them to be the best chickens out of a few other breeds I had. They fit in well with the flock & produced a lot of eggs & chicks for me. I had to give them away when I left the country for work so hadn't gotten up the courage to eat them at that time.
  3. Better Than Rubies
    3/5,
    "Fine chicken breed :)"
    Pros - Gorgeous colors
    Cons - (A bit) skittish/flighty
    Not all that good of a layer
    Smaller eggs
    My SLW, Lacey, is so beautiful! But she was so wild as a chick...hated being touched. In fact, she hated me being even a little close to her.
    Once she started maturing and getting ready to lay, she became much more friendly, and even a joy to be around. :) Then she got flighty again when she started molting at a young age last fall (not even a year); but she's somewhat friendly again now that she's finished her molt. She also stopped laying in earlier November last year, definitely before even looking like she'd barely started her molt, and didn't start back up until early February this year (so didn't lay at all for well over two months).
    Also, her eggs are on the medium size, but I just thought they should be bigger. They are a beautiful perfect egg shape, though, and tend to be a lovely creamy (brown) color and coated in tiny white speckles...a (few) times last year she even laid lovely pink-hued eggs, in fact!

User Comments

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  1. sassypants123
    My little Fritta Bobitta is a SLW. She stays close to the flock and loves to cuddle. When she gets distracted by a bug or something and the others wander too far from her, she will put on a great show of catching up with the rest of the girls.
  2. Dmontgomery
    We have a very large flock of between 80-100 birds total. Fortunately we have only 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes. They have been by far the least friendly breed we’ve ever raised. They are the only ones who will actively harass mother hens with young chicks. Even our guineas respect broody mommas with young chicks, but the Wyandottes seem to go out of their way to actually chase chicks away from food. They don’t just give them a gentle peck on the head like most hens do, they will pursue them violently until the mother hen can rescue the chicks. In watching their interactions with the other adult birds, it appears they are pretty low on the pecking order, so I assume they feel the need to dominate somebody, and the chicks are the only ones they can physically handle. Although they are good layers, I wish we had never got them.
  3. Mimi Lover
    Pretty birds, but ours were super mean to all our other breeds, weren't very cuddly but not by any means aggressive, though i, won't get this breed again.
      Dmontgomery likes this.
  4. cherylwillard1
    I don't know, my wyandottes are flighty and timid. The barred rocks are much calmer and less squirmy when I handle them. But they are still pretty young; they are all a year old this April. Maybe they'll calm down now.
  5. KandJChickenFarm
    Love our Silver Laced Wyandotte girls. They're almost a year old, and have yet to lay every day consecutively, but we love them!
  6. Linda Joy
    I ordered a hen and a rooster Wyandotte in my chick order and I’m excited to see them mature! What a cool breed and beautiful!!
  7. francel
    I have 7 of them 4 golden laced and 3 silver laced . Love them! Gentle, friendly, beautiful. Not laying yet , 18 weeks old
  8. RAnst4038
    Have 2 Silver from Agway, wild refuse to be tamed. Like to run & fly as fast as they can. I think if they got out of the back yard they would just keep going. 20 weeks no eggs or interest in rooster. Very small comb & waddles but never saw them panting on 100* 100% days. Get on top coop for fun of flying. Lucky my two 5 year old Reds are still laying every other day.
      AmyAvenues likes this.
    1. cherylwillard1
      My wyandottes took about 24 weeks to lay. Hang in there. Once they start, you should have eggs almost daily. Even after they start laying, they're flighty.
      cherylwillard1, Mar 30, 2019
  9. Invergrove
    First timer. They say 20 weeks to first egg, and maybe on occasion at 18 weeks. My Wyandotte hen Rosie turned 16 weeks last Thursday, laid her first egg on Friday and one a day since then. Wow, what a girl!
      Happychi2019, ycornelis and beati like this.
  10. cwren
    I have 3; a rooster--gorgeous! 2 hens--one of which has a lighter comb. She is not the sharpest knife in the drawer. We've nicknamed her 'dummy' and we always have to look for her as she is always a few minutes late to the party. Also she seems incapable of figuring out where the door to the run is! It takes forever to get her in there.
      samzoost likes this.

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