Aggressive Roo

hpyfmly

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 4, 2014
56
2
41
Northern Florida
We have a beautiful, 6-month-old Americauna rooster that we love. We've raised him since he was only two days old. He is becoming more and more aggressive and I have done a lot of reading on how to get them over that. For the last month of so, we've been holding him, in front of his girls in an effort to show him we're more dominant, It works for a couple of days, but then we're back to him coming at us again. Now, all that to say we're not afraid to cull him if needed, but I would love to know if this is just an adolescent phase and maybe he'll grow out of it?? The video below is of my daughter holding him this morning after he came at her. This is after she had been holding him for about 25 minutes. Is this normal??
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Firekin1

Songster
7 Years
Apr 5, 2014
455
38
136
Nova Scotia
Ha! Rotten bugger...lol...I have a few that do that, only method I found that has worked is a good wack with a straw broom across the yard...I have one now that has no problem with any adults coming in the yard, but children, I've seen him just HEAR them and run across 2 acres to get them. Their hormones are on over drive, the hen to roo ratio also plays a part as well and if there is more than just one roo around. They can also just plain out be hateful too. Is he actually jumping you or just rushing at you?
 

hpyfmly

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 4, 2014
56
2
41
Northern Florida
Thanks for the reply :) He is the only roo and we have 5 hens right now, though we do want to get more soon. Also, he mostly rushes us, but will sometimes fly at my son and he has done that to me the few times I've turned my back to him, which we try to be mindful of. He is more aggressive with my 12-year-old son, but we have always been very kind to the chickens and he never has chased them or been mean to them. Just thought I should clarify that. He is the nicest to my husband, lol! He has NEVER come at him, but he's also the one who helps me catch him when I can't!
 

chickchoon1

Chirping
5 Years
Sep 5, 2014
166
6
63
Ohio
Glad to hear you can deal with it if aggression can't be resolved as from my 11 years with chickens have only had 2 males, out of appx.10 that I have raised, that have been gentle enough to keep-and we slaughtered , humanely, the remaining 8. My current roo, 18 mo, had a touch of a problem and he calmed down with being booted at but he was never so severe as to flog us with his spurs. They can be very quick and very dangerous and its not worth it, imo. Especially if you think you're going to try to reproduce with him as any offspring will have more of a chance of being a jerk like he is.I started out with my chickens thought of as pets but realized quickly that was for my benefit and not theirs.They're treating so they are happy chickens til the end.
 

centrarchid

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Sep 19, 2009
26,373
17,719
856
Holts Summit, Missouri
We have a beautiful, 6-month-old Americauna rooster that we love. We've raised him since he was only two days old. He is becoming more and more aggressive and I have done a lot of reading on how to get them over that. For the last month of so, we've been holding him, in front of his girls in an effort to show him we're more dominant, It works for a couple of days, but then we're back to him coming at us again. Now, all that to say we're not afraid to cull him if needed, but I would love to know if this is just an adolescent phase and maybe he'll grow out of it?? The video below is of my daughter holding him this morning after he came at her. This is after she had been holding him for about 25 minutes. Is this normal??
Show a video of him coming at someone. What I really want you to show is how the person attacked behaves before, during and after a given bout.
 

hpyfmly

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 4, 2014
56
2
41
Northern Florida
Show a video of him coming at someone. What I really want you to show is how the person attacked behaves before, during and after a given bout.
I've been trying, but he's been pretty passive the last couple of days. He did come at my son last night while all of us were sitting with the chickens. He does not like us to hold his girls and that's what set him off last night. Which really is him doing his job; protecting his girls even though his girls like to be held ;) That being said, 99% of the time he doesn't need a reason to be mean to us. It's usually just out of the blue.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,026
32,761
1,102
Colorado Rockies
First of all, yes, this is a temporary, adolescent thing. Way too many people give up on a roo soon after he comes into his hormones and they cull him. If you can last through this phase, which is intense for approximately six months, he will calm down and mellow out. For the most part.

I qualify that because human behavior around the cockerel and with him will dictate how he responds. It's about trust and fear. Those humans who show confidence when dealing with the young roo will inspire the same in the roo. Those who are not sure of where they stand with the roo inspire the same in him.

He's especially nervous when humans are handling the hens. He needs to learn you know what you're doing and won't harm them. Usually, it's helpful to keep him separate from the hens until after he's a year old if he shows a lot of nervousness when you're in with the hens, gathering eggs, etc.

If you plan to keep the roo, you need to discipline him. Like dogs, roosters also like to know where they stand with their humans. They need boundaries, too. So when he displays obnoxious behavior you need to stop it by pushing him directly down onto the ground, holding his head immobile until he relaxes, then release him. Handling him often is good and will establish your dominance with him. It's very, very difficult for roosters to trust children, so their interaction during the adolescent period isn't desirable.

This is all preliminary advice. If you decide to keep the roo, it involves commitment and work.
 

hpyfmly

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 4, 2014
56
2
41
Northern Florida
Thank you for your response! I really do want to give him a chance and not cull him just because everyone says we should. I have heard so many different opinions when it comes to roosters and was intrigued when I heard that he could just be going through an adolescent phase. We are willing to give him a chance and hopefully he will be better for it. If not, we can always make a decision later.

As far as my 12-year-old is concerned, he is very respectful of all our animals and is not afraid to get the roo when he comes at him. I will just make sure that someone is with him until the roo is past this stage.

Thanks again for your insight! I greatly appreciate it!
 

centrarchid

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Sep 19, 2009
26,373
17,719
856
Holts Summit, Missouri
I've been trying, but he's been pretty passive the last couple of days.  He did come at my son last night while all of us were sitting with the chickens.  He does not like us to hold his girls and that's what set him off last night.  Which really is him doing his job; protecting his girls even though his girls like to be held ;)  That being said, 99% of the time he doesn't need a reason to be mean to us.  It's usually just out of the blue.  


Currently his reason is you are there. Video would do a couple of things. First you will get to pick apart his signaling to understand his mental state. Really important information will be from before actual attack. Secondly, simply the act of filming will force you to adjust your reactions to him and dull your responses. He is more likely than not getting a response that suits him.
 

Noble Rooster

Songster
10 Years
Apr 28, 2009
273
5
133
NY
How do you help a cockerel learn manners before they hit the hormone-crazed stage? Looks like we've ended up with one by accident (not 100% sure yet) and right now he's relaxed and friendly -- hopefully he stays that way, since I have a 3-year-old! I've been making sure to handle him a lot and pick up all the girls in his presence so he knows that's the deal around here. How else can I teach him to be a gentleman before he grows up? Or will hormones just erase what he learns? Also, looks like now we have 5 hens -- is that going to cause a problem as far as the hen-roo ratio?
 

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