Are alfalfa sprouts safe for goslings?

Discussion in 'Geese' started by cochins1088, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a 2 week old sebastopol gosling and when I went to the store for more collard greens, I noticed the alfalfa sprouts. They looked like something that she would enjoy, so I purchased them.

    Now I'm researching to find out whether or not they are safe and I can't seem to find any information. It seems safe for chicks to eat, but how about ducklings and goslings? Also, does anyone know how they compare nutritionally?
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2013
  2. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    chopped and given along with grit you could see if she would eat them, but grit is very important if feeding anything other than starter feed. just sprinkle the grit on the floor of the brooder and she'll use as needed. also chopped romaine lettuce may be a big hit.
    Not sure about alfalfa sprouts but I have heard geese don't care for alfalfa hay.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2013
  3. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I haven't given her grit yet.. and I don't have any at this time. Would sand work?

    I've been feeding her collard greens and starter since she was 3 days old. I was told that romaine lettuce doesn't have all of the required nutrients and that I should be feeding collard greens, so that's what I have been doing.

    She is my only gosling (and goose) at this time, so she is spoiled rotten and is still living in my bedroom.
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Your not just feeding her collards are you? I mean she is getting starter feed to?also she needs to have niacin added to her water daily, 100-150mgs per gallon of water to keep her legs strong. yes sand will be fine, they just need to be able to chew their food and thats what the grit and sand is for, they don't have teeth to chew their food. lettuce and collards and anything else other than a good quality feed is just a treat.

    Please read this it's taken from the duck thread but basically the same for goslings.. https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/750869/raising-and-caring-for-ducklings#post_10611711
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2013
  5. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She has collard greens and a starter available all day and night and I just purchased the niacin.

    Are they really only supposed to be a treat? I was told that greens need to be 90% of a gosling's diet.
     
  6. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Cochins you are doing GREAT. Yes greens need to be 90% of the diet with the starter free choice all day/night until 30 days of age. At 30 days of age you can take the food/water away at night to keep things a bit cleaner. The sprouts might be a big hit, if you offer them find a pet store where you can find parakeet grit at and offer her some of it with the sprouts. Be sure she has lots of room to run and flap her wings as well while inside. It helps strengthen wing muscles for those feathers that will be growing in and are very heavy.


    Here is a short list of items you can be giving her: (sand is OK, but parakeet grit is much better)

    Callard, Kale, brocolli, and other deep dark greens (avoid spinach)

    shredded carrot in small amounts

    shredded apple

    melon
     
  7. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Celtic!

    I'll try giving her some sprouts and possibly a bit of apple tomorrow along with grit and her collard greens and starter.

    I let her run around as often as I can. I take her out to our heated garage and let her follow me around to get some exercize. The cage she is in is 2 ft by 3 ft, so it's fairly big and she seems happy with it. I plan to move her to the barn with the ducklings in a week and hopefully I'll be able to find her a gosling friend soon.
     
  8. wildpeas

    wildpeas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found that my goslings liked the apple better if I softened it up in hot water first, drain off the water of course before feeding.
     
  9. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Well now that it's been clarified you really had me thinking you were only feeding your gosling collards. sorry I misinderstood. what Celtic said of course is very true, My only concern was she was only getting collards and nothing else. which would have be detramental to her health. and at 2 weeks old would be condsidered a treat to me instead of what she was needing over all.
     
  10. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No problem, thanks for trying to help Miss Lydia! I really apprecitate it!


    and I'll try putting the bits of apple in hot water before feeding, thanks wildpeas!
     

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