Are little yellow/white worms falling from my ponderosa pine safe for my chickens to eat?

swamphiker

Crowing
Feb 24, 2020
1,020
4,368
341
Florida
My Coop
My Coop
They are likely larvae of a moth, beetle or sawfly, all of which are great protein snacks for your chickens. I could probably narrow it down if you are able to get a good photo of them. Also, where are you located?
 
May 12, 2020
34
28
56
They are likely larvae of a moth, beetle or sawfly, all of which are great protein snacks for your chickens. I could probably narrow it down if you are able to get a good photo of them. Also, where are you located?
This is what they look like. There were tons of them again this morning. Seems like they must not be poisonous because the chickens ate a bunch yesterday and they seem fine. Still curious if anyone knows for sure what they are.
20200526_121036.jpg
20200526_113409.jpg
20200526_121036.jpg
20200526_113409.jpg
20200526_113320.jpg
20200526_113315.jpg
20200526_113318.jpg
 
May 12, 2020
34
28
56
They are likely larvae of a moth, beetle or sawfly, all of which are great protein snacks for your chickens. I could probably narrow it down if you are able to get a good photo of them. Also, where are you located?
Also I forgot to include that we are in Spokane, Washington.
Thanks!
 
May 12, 2020
34
28
56
Thanks for the helpful photos! These larvae look like the larvae of pine catkin sawflies possibly in the genus Xyela (which are actually wasps), which shouldn't be harmful to your chooks.
What do the sawflies do as adults? Are they predatory wasps? Do they sting? If so, maybe I should set out containers to catch as many as I can to protect the bees and my toddler.
 

swamphiker

Crowing
Feb 24, 2020
1,020
4,368
341
Florida
My Coop
My Coop
What do the sawflies do as adults? Are they predatory wasps? Do they sting? If so, maybe I should set out containers to catch as many as I can to protect the bees and my toddler.
Sawflies do not sting are not harmful to bees or humans; adults mostly feed on nectar and pollen. I think it would be best to leave them be, since they are pollinators like butterflies and native bees. Given how many larvae your chickens are finding, I would bet that your local wild birds are benefitting from the extra food since many of them have nestlings to feed right now. Here is some more info on sawflies if you are curious:
https://wimastergardener.org/article/sawflies/
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom