Are there wild bird eggs that can be incubated for release?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Irajoe, Jan 28, 2009.

  1. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    The migratory bird act makes it illegal to possess the eggs, feathers, nests, etc.. of any migratory birds. In effect making it illegal to hatch nearly all the species you'd want to repopulate without acquiring a difficult license and working directly with a local group.
     
  2. citalk2much

    citalk2much Twilight Blessings Farm

    Dec 22, 2008
    GR MI: TN bound!
    Anything that migrants requires a federal permit we have one they are hard to get!
    Taking eggs is a big fine and you risk the life of the bird if you do not raise them right. This requires training it is not the same as farm animals. Not trying to sound mean but to see an animal suffer because someone meaning well did something wrong
     
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  3. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't think you would be able to incubate wild birds for release. As stated earlier, the only birds that aren't federally protected are the pests, such as the sparrow, pigeons, and starling. And we don't need anymore of those released since they are a non-native pest.

    I think the ONLY way to do this legally is to become part of a conservation or special research project. Then again, I'm sure that these aren't easy to get into and have strict limitations. I know that some endangered raptors went through a conservation program, in which scientists and whatnot would take all but one egg, replace them with wooden eggs and then incubate the collected eggs. This way the endangered parents could give the remaining egg all the attention and increase the survival of that one chick, while it's siblings were raised for either captive breeding or release.

    This isn't just a matter of obtaining a wildlife rehabber permit, but you would have to get federal permits and probably become part of a special team or effort.

    If you are wanting to help repopulate native species, the best thing to do is set up species specific houses. Provide plenty of food sources, seed and plants and maybe even mealworms. Then cut back on all the non-native species that are threatening native bird populations. This means trapping feral cats and taking them to the humane society, trapping and killing invasive species of sparrow and starlings.

    If you google "starling traps" or "sparrow traps" and even "pigeon traps" you will find traps you can make to capture these birds. I read that once the birds killed, you can donate frozen starling and sparrow and probably pigeon bodies to a local raptor rescue. These traps are used by big time wild bird enthusiast and are typically live traps, that way any protected non-target species can be easily released, unharmed.

    We have bluebird houses that we maintain on our property. Cleaned out yearly, and if they are ever inhabitated by sparrows or starlings, they are evicted immediately.

    Populations will bounce back on their own, if the means are provided. Between food, housing, and keeping non-native preds(feral cats) and competitors(starling/sparrow/pigeon) down, you will help your local bird population significantly and probably stay pretty busy!

    -Kim
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2009
  4. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    Quote:Alot of good points Kim, would like to add,stray dogs(or ones running free) Racoons and possums. They do more harm to bird nest, and need control.

    Bluebirds are making a come back ,thanks to people like you. Placing nest boxes,and keeping those starling out.

    But the starling can learn to talk if taken when young.
     
  5. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks. The only reason I didn't list raccoons, opossums, and fox(etc) was because they are native preds and sometimes protected. You can build bird houses that a pred proof, which basically means it's X high off the ground and a metal pole to prevent animals from climbing and accessing the nest.

    Trapping feral cats, pigeons, starlings, and sparrows(and dogs) wouldn't be illegal as long as they are treated humanely(not left in the traps to starve, or something else crazy). Some really zealous wild bird enthusiast shoot cats on sight, but I would probably prefer taking them to the pound, just in case they are an escaped family pet.

    If you set up feed stations and are really zealous about this project, you can fence off the feed stations. Many times animals like cats(and hawks, etc) will grab birds while they are feeding on the ground(spilt seed). By fencing off the feed stations it keeps cats away from the feeders and provides somewhat of a "safe" zone for food.
     
  6. Irajoe

    Irajoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very helpful information...and educational. I never considered the possibility of taking eggs from the wild for incubation...but it makes a great thread of discussion. [​IMG]

    Perhaps incorrectly, I had hoped that some birds, whose eggs could be purchased, retained natural instincts and - after hatching - could be released into the wild. Thus...repopulating the area.
     
  7. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Oh okay. If that's the case your selection is severely limited. You would have to look into game birds, such as quail and pheasants. You can purchase their eggs from other breeders, but you will also have to look up local laws. Sometimes you will need more than just one permit, one for keeping gamebirds and then another for releasing them.

    Other types of wild birds, such as songbirds, you would not be able to purchase their eggs for incubation. Federally protected(migratory) species, it is illegal for you to have possession of their eggs period, either bought or wild harvested.
     
  8. citalk2much

    citalk2much Twilight Blessings Farm

    Dec 22, 2008
    GR MI: TN bound!
    Quote:Oh okay. If that's the case your selection is severely limited. You would have to look into game birds, such as quail and pheasants. You can purchase their eggs from other breeders, but you will also have to look up local laws. Sometimes you will need more than just one permit, one for keeping gamebirds and then another for releasing them.

    Other types of wild birds, such as songbirds, you would not be able to purchase their eggs for incubation. Federally protected(migratory) species, it is illegal for you to have possession of their eggs period, either bought or wild harvested.

    Very well put and true
     
  9. Irajoe

    Irajoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The level of knowledge and experience represented on this forum is quite impressive......I'm very grateful.
     
  10. Dill

    Dill Chilling Out

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    why would you want to do that? Besides the laws against it that everyone seems to be so concerned about, it wouldn't be good to the birds. you can't raise birds and then just release them, they'd be used to humans, they wouldn't know how to survive in the wild, and would probably end up being food soon after you released them. Raising them and keeping them as pets I can understand...
     

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