Are we doing something wrong????

elphabafalls

Songster
Jul 27, 2020
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We have 6 Gold Sex Links and 1 Rhode Island Red that are about 21 to 22 weeks old. We're in Oklahoma, so the weather goes back and forth between the 30's and the 60's this time of year, so it's unpredictable at best. Not a single one of them has started laying as far as we can tell. We check the coop daily. We've check all over the yard. Is it unusual for none of them to have laid a single egg yet? Also, we were waiting to unblock the nesting boxes until they started laying. Should we wait or unblock them now? Help????
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,396
38,530
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Colorado Rockies
You are not alone. Many of us have pullets of age to begin laying, but zero eggs have appeared. My pullets are eight months old, and they just happened to reach the age of point of lay at the time of year the days quit being long enough to trigger their hormones. One is even displaying pelvic bones at exactly the perfect distance apart, two finger widths.

Unless you want to try augmenting light to extend the number of hours of light to at least twelve hours, you will need to be patient until after winter solstice passes and the days begin to lengthen. By the end of January, i expect to see some precious little pullet starter eggs.
 

HeatherKellyB

"One day or Day one"
Premium Feather Member
May 31, 2019
5,359
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Moore County, NC
Each bird will start to lay on their own schedule and don't seem to care that we're getting a bit impatient waiting, haha. It does seem like oftentimes whenever someone posts about this, they'll find an egg shortly after. Coincidence? I hope you know that I am being completely light hearted
 

kelzey

Songster
Aug 14, 2020
318
752
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newfoundland and labrador, canada
i find that the more you want it, the longer they take! before my first one began to lay, i told her that i didn’t care (i do though) if she ever lays an egg in her life. and then the next day she started to squat for me! i mean of course they will lay when they are ready- you’re not doing anything wrong. patience is key! that first egg will be very exciting. you could try posting some pictures of them if you’d like- people can tell you if they are getting close, depending on wattle and comb color and development.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
17,881
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WA, Pac NW
My Coop
My Coop
They lay when they're ready. 21-22 weeks and not laying isn't unusual at all.

I would unblock nest boxes now. You don't want them to start laying elsewhere and for that to become a bad habit. Also it gives you time to ensure that they'll continue to roost properly even with nest boxes open.
 

elphabafalls

Songster
Jul 27, 2020
106
156
123
Hi! Have their combs and wattles started growing and/or getting red? Have you checked their pelvic spacing?
I don't know how to measure their pelvic spacing. I'm new at this - these are my first chicken children. I've been trying to research and prepare as much as I can, but I've not learned how to do that lol. It's funny you asked about their combs and wattles. About a week and a half ago, I noticed that some of the girls' combs and wattles were suddenly much larger and redder. I was so excited!
 

elphabafalls

Songster
Jul 27, 2020
106
156
123
You are not alone. Many of us have pullets of age to begin laying, but zero eggs have appeared. My pullets are eight months old, and they just happened to reach the age of point of lay at the time of year the days quit being long enough to trigger their hormones. One is even displaying pelvic bones at exactly the perfect distance apart, two finger widths.

Unless you want to try augmenting light to extend the number of hours of light to at least twelve hours, you will need to be patient until after winter solstice passes and the days begin to lengthen. By the end of January, i expect to see some precious little pullet starter eggs.
We actually tried putting a light in their coop when the days got very short that put off just a tiny bit of heat. We thought that the heat, since it was so low, might also help on the nights it dropped into the 30's. They HATED it! After 3 days, we took it out. When the sun began to set and they'd put themselves to bed, they would pace under the light while staring up at it. They would also give me the stink eye. The following mornings, they acted tired and wanted to nap during the day when they usually want to go, go, go. We're actually fine with being patient until their ready. We were just experimenting since they were reaching laying age at the exact same time the days got short. We just wanted to make sure that we weren't doing something wrong. I'd actually be fine if they never started laying. They're adorable and sweet. I never thought chickens would have such distinctive personalities.
 

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