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Baby Cottontail bunny

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by ilovemychickies, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. ilovemychickies

    ilovemychickies Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hi all! My friend's dad was mowing his lawn and he found an injured baby cottontail bunny. His leg is broken and his nose is bleeding. What should we do and how do we take care of it? I don't think that there are any places nearby that will take care of baby bunnies. [​IMG] We really need help! Thanks in advance.






    Ashleigh
     
  2. luvmychicknkids

    luvmychicknkids Canning Squirrel

    Mar 6, 2008
    Floresville, Texas
    How old is it? I would get a vet to look at it ASAP if possible, if not, you could try to splint the leg. I would just get it in a quiet, warm, comfortable place and go from there. You will need milk replacer and a bottle. Have no clue if they have it for bunnies? I had to use puppy formula when I bottle fed orphaned opossums. Good luck with the little guy.
     
  3. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    Bunnies are tough. There hearts beat so very fast, they are prone to heart attacks from high levels of stress like to much handling. handle the bunny AS LITTLE as possible, keep it in a dark, quiet area with no dogs and cats around. (they have a good sense of smell--adds more stress if they can smell a predator)

    Fixing an injured rabbit is just as tough. Their skin (ecsp. wild rabbits) are so very thin. When trying to suture them, the stitches just rip through. As a novice vet tech and niave young adult, I made a doctor prove this to me on a wild rabbit. he was right.

    If it is in fact broken, he will have difficultly healing, if not becoming unreleaseable. Keep him a short of time as possible. Even wild bunnies kept from nursing babies dont live long in capitivity. I have read much research on this and have lots of 1st and 2nd hand experience.

    I may just be coming across like a big meanine but I am telling you this as an experience certified rehabber and vet tech!

    Good luck. I hope he heals up quickly and makes it back on his way! His best bet is a rehabber. If you call a local vet they should be able to point you in the right direction!
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2008
  4. ilovemychickies

    ilovemychickies Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks guys! Right now he is safe and sound in a big basket with hay and grass in it and a blankie over the top in my room since my room tends to be really dark. Tomorrow I'll see if we can find anywhere that will take him. Thanks so much guys! [​IMG]






    Ashleigh
     
  5. chickbea

    chickbea Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2007
    Vermont
    tiffanyh is right - depending on how young the bun is, you could be looking at an uphill fight.
    I'd say your best bet is a wildlife rehabilitator. If you don't know where to find one you can call your local game warden's office and they can give you the number of someone who specializes in bunnies.
    Good luck!
     

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