Barred roo over silver spangled? Cclxappenzeller

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by Mr. Tburg, Nov 6, 2019.

  1. Mr. Tburg

    Mr. Tburg Chirping

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    Hi, I was just wondering how a cclxsilver spangled appenzeller Spitzhauben would look and how the barring and silver spangled Gene's work would a roo and hen look similar or different
    I found a pic that people were guessing to be this cross would the females look the same? 700.jpeg.jpg
     
  2. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    Depends on who's the parent.

    Ccl male x App female = half spangled, barred males and females like the one above

    App male x ccl female = half spangled barred males, half spangled females.
     
  3. Mr. Tburg

    Mr. Tburg Chirping

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    I have a ccl roo and a silver appenzeller hen. so half the males would be barred and half would be spangled?
     
  4. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    No all would be barred and what is called half spangled.

    Half spangled = incomplete spangling
     
  5. Mr. Tburg

    Mr. Tburg Chirping

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    How is the barring gene from the roo passed on to its offspring? Is it 1 copy to males and none to the females?
     
  6. Mr. Tburg

    Mr. Tburg Chirping

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    I've been trying to understand the barring gene and I found this

    "Barred females carry only one copy of the barring gene. Barred males carry two copies of the gene, so the females can be only one color. The rooster has two genes so roosters can ether be like the hen or can have more color than the single gene. If this is confusing, read on.

    A barred male that carries only one barred gene when crossed to a barred female will produce about 25% barred cockerels. Half of those barred cockerels will have a single barred gene. The other half of those will have the double barred gene. The remaining will be 25% barred females and 25% solid females.

    Taking a barred male with one barring gene and crossing it to a solid colored femal will produce 25% barred makes with one barring gene and 25% barred females. The remaining 50% of the birds will be of a solid color.

    Now on to a barred male with two barred genes. If you take that double barred rooster and cross it to a barred female you will get about 50% barred males that will carry the double barring gene. The remaining 50% of hens will be barred.

    To cross a barred male with two barring genes to a solid female you should plan on getting about 50% barred cockerels with one barring gene. The remaining half will be barred pullets. Breeding a double gene barring rooster to a solid hen will give you the result of having the most barred offspring. Using the finest stock you can obtain of both barred rooster and solid hen will give you the best results.

    Last but not least the solid male crossed with a barred female will give you 50% barred males with one barring gene and half solid pullets."

    But its talking about barred crossed with a solid does this apply to crossing barred to spangled also?
     
  7. Mr. Tburg

    Mr. Tburg Chirping

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    Is the one in the picture barred half spangled looks to be a roo
     
  8. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    Yes. A very obvious male.
     
  9. ShannonR

    ShannonR Crowing

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    I take it barring is a dominant trait? Does this trait exist on a single loci or more?
     
  10. RoostersAreAwesome

    RoostersAreAwesome Free Ranging

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    It applies to any unbarred chicken.
     
    MysteryChicken likes this.

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