Best way to eat a rooster?

brookerlip

Hatching
10 Years
May 19, 2009
1
0
7
Santa Cruz, CA
We've decided we just can't keep Johnny, our Buff Brahma (not Bantam) rooster. We're prepared to kill him as humanely as possible and add him to our supper table. I was planning on roasting him but a friend recently told me that it won't taste good because he's a rooster and the meat will be too tough. I hadn't heard that before. He's approximately 5 months old and quite a hefty guy. Can anyone shed any light on this subject? What's the proper age to slaughter a bird for meat? Will a rooster of this breed and age taste good if roasted or do I need to make soup? Thank you for your insight!
 

maplesky7

Flock Mistress
11 Years
Jun 14, 2008
7,215
7
251
N. IL.
don't people here put them in a salt brine and soak them for a while and slow cooked in a crock pot for the most tender I think... isn't that how I've read people do it?
 

max13077

Songster
12 Years
Feb 3, 2008
868
4
174
Fingerlakes Upstate, NY
I actually think they taste better older. Young they have kind of a bland taste. I guess it's just preference. I've been eating deer, rabbit, and just about everything else all my life. So when the ubiquitous "chicken" (cornish X) comes up, it's pretty run of the mill.
 

kingmt

Songster
11 Years
May 1, 2009
1,670
32
231
Mason WV
The rotisserie. Yes. It's great.

I free range my Cornish Rock & let them go about 14 weeks but I don't think there is anything bland about them. I've not eaten a standard breed that young that I remember. Now the store bought chicken I don't know if I would say bland but yuk.
 

VA from WV

Songster
10 Years
Sep 26, 2009
119
0
109
Eastern Pandhandle WV
Quote:
5 months isn't that old, and even if the bird were old, you can study a little about hanging game meat to achieve a natural tenderness that -may- be suitable for roasting. Chicken is not normally something that you hang, but it is my impression that you don't have to hang for long for the desired effect. Must be done under refrigeration. (CAVEAT: You MUST read up and inform yourself about temperatures and procedures or you can make yourself sick.)

Brining is also another way to get there. I brine holiday birds overnight or longer and they are more tender and juicy. There are many sources on brining worth reading.
 

Lil Chickie Mama

Songster
10 Years
Apr 1, 2009
545
4
141
California
When I did mine I let the meat "rest" for a day or two and I had planned on brining them but I was lazy. I did mine at 18 or 19 weeks and they tasted great. I didn't even use spices on mine other than salt and pepper inside and out and I also put an onion and sliced carrot in the cavity while roasting. I say the best way to eat rooster is to either roast it, do the rotisserie thing, or to slather it in barbecue sauce and cook it then put it on a pizza yum yum!
 

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