BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. apteryx

    apteryx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Whoa! Greenfire has dropped their prices to $29 and $19. Of course they still have their $35 shipping and you have to deal with the whims of USPS....
     
  2. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As someone who has been working on rhodebars for quite a while, I can give you my experience... you get what you pay for. ;-)
    First of all, the stock from GFF (at least rhodebars) needs dire improvement... and that's assuming they are even purebred.
    Aside from that, I had my own reasons for wanting autosexed dual purpose poultry... I have a large ready outlet for day old cockerels. Please note all the adjectives I just used... autosexed AND dual purpose.
    The rhodebars I started with lay awesome, but dual purpose they are not. For something that "should" be the equivalent of a standard bred RIR (with autosexing and proper barring), the rhodebar foundation stock didn't even come close.
    So, you need to consider your reasons for wanting an autosexed variety. If it's something you really want, then I suggest you get best corresponding genetics you can and begin your own breed improvement project. It's been a great project and I've learned a ton, but it isn't an overnight sensation.
    I am blessed with some very awesome RIR, otherwise I wouldn't have taken this project on. The RIR I have are truly dual purpose, have excellent carcasses and lay very well - I absolutely love them.
    I have both a large egg market and meat market (that's how we make our living... beef, lamb, poultry and rabbits... so being able to sell day old cockerels to chefs knowing they'll be nice breasted cockerels with great flavor fits nicely into our market.
    It's working well for us, but I realize it isn't for everyone.
    Weigh the pros and cons for yourself... if you have the time and the space you could create something really wonderful. ;-)
     
  3. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    Have you thought about keeping them yourself and using the meat? I took some of the cocks we just butchered, took the raw meat off the bones, and ran the meat through a hand-crank meat grinder. I got a little over 7 lbs of ground chicken from 4 carcasses. The bones and skin I threw into the freezer and will make broth from them when I have time. I've already tried some of the ground chicken and was quite pleased. I normally buy turkey burger instead of ground beef, since turkey is cheaper. But it is almost $3/lb for a frozen roll of it, fresh ground turkey is even higher, closer to the cost of ground beef.
     
  4. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We always keep a certain number of each kind of animal for us each year... but selling the extra is business. Afterall, we can't eat several hundred sheep, several dozen steers, or several hundred cockerels. ;-) even if you're feeding your own family, most poultry folks hatch out way more cockerels than they can eat each year.
     
  5. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    Well if you can easily find a market for them within the confines of your state laws, then it is worth getting the money for them.
     
  6. ronott1

    ronott1 Daily Digest Guru Premium Member Project Manager

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    How old were they?
     
  7. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    The ones I used for ground chicken were year old cocks that we hadn't had time to butcher yet. They were the obvious culls and a little smaller than the ones still out there that I need to go through for a final cull. Their carcasses dressed out at 5 to 5.5 lbs. If I had taken more time I could have gotten a little more meat, but since I was going to use the scraps for broth anyway, I didn't feel like getting every single piece of meat off the bones.

    Also did some 5 month old cockerels that dressed out at 4 to 4.5 lbs. They went into the freezer whole.
     
  8. ronott1

    ronott1 Daily Digest Guru Premium Member Project Manager

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    That is a great use of them.

    I usually make chicken and dumplings out of the old ones--and skin them instead of plucking them.
     
  9. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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  10. RiddleMe

    RiddleMe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2015

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