BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Yep. Some advise placing a warm, moist pack or pad over it to enhance the action but I never do that as it works just fine as is. In the horse racing industry it's been used for ages on sprains, inflammations, etc. to get horses back on the track faster. It can even draw infection from wounds. It's pretty powerful on regrowing hair(African American women often use it to regrow damaged hair or gain length on their hair), skin, scales and hooves as well....I got to see that one on my birds here. Also got to see how it worked on an old, gimpy rooster...gave him relief that lasted a long, long time.

    It's thick and goopy but has no smell, taste or odor. I used it on plantar fasciitis recently and it worked quickly and lasted several days, I've used it on arthritis pain, neurological pain, herniated disc pain, etc.

    Don't let the medical community hear about us using it for pain...they'll revamp it, rejuvenate the patent and start charging an arm and a leg for it. [​IMG]
     
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  2. ronott1

    ronott1 Daily Digest Guru Premium Member Project Manager

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    They already have--Castiva is a jazzed up castor oil and is quite pricey.
     
  3. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Why, those dirty, greedy so and so's!!!! [​IMG] [​IMG] Called it, didn't I? [​IMG] There's always someone out there hoping to skin us out of our money for something common. Like raw honey for wounds....soon as the medical profession found out folks were using it on long standing wounds and even on burns, with good effect, they developed a line of bandages called MediHoney and charged an astronomical price for it.
     
  4. Beer can

    Beer can Chicken Obsessed

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    Read up on the health benefits of black meat chicken. Actually there are many health benefits to all chicken meat, but fibro meat ups the ante. Its high in the antioxidant amino acid carnosine. The carnosine levels in black chicken are twice the amount than in regular chickens. What does it do? They say prevent cancer and diseases and reverses he ageing process. Is it a 'super food' yeah, about the same as blueberries, goji berries or spinach and broccoli.
     
  5. Beer can

    Beer can Chicken Obsessed

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    My inspiration came from this

    "We have been developing a large dual purpose domestic chicken breed from Japanese and Indonesian heritage breeds for about fourteen years. The heritage breeds ( Ayam cemani, Koeyoshi, Japanese Silky, Black Sumatra) which have contributed their genes to our new breed, each have Gallus bankiva (the Indonesian Red JF) in their maternal ancestry and specific genes found in Ceylon and Grey Jf in their paternal ancestry. These genes were accrued in ancient times but using the chicken genome mapping data, we selected desirable genes and traits for inclusion in a new breed. We are selecting for extra carnosine in the meat and eggs of this breed which we call the Cabbage Hill Charcoal Chicken. The colour type is called Raku."
    posted on another site in 2006.
    [​IMG]

    NEW FORUM LOCATED AT
     
  6. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I be thinking you could buy or grow a lot of broccoli for the cost of one of those birds. Seems to me to be one of those money making projects wherein you invest a chunk of money to raise this rare breed, thinking you'll sell your eggs and offspring for a chunk of money because you paid a chunk of money. Sort of like alpaca farming....everyone wanted in on it because they were so expensive at first, but as soon as everyone bought into it, the prices went down and now I see ads for folks giving them away.

    Usually the only folks making money on those deals were the ones selling impossibly high dollar animals to begin with, who convinced other folks they could make money too.

    And, who in the world could afford to eat these chickens???

    Nah...the Emperor is naked.
     
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  7. Beer can

    Beer can Chicken Obsessed

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    I'm paying $85 for a breeding trio of the NN/cemani crosses and she will have fed and raised them for a few months by time I get them, not what they want for them other places. Luckily I found this breeder on BYC and she lives two hours from me so I plan on picking them up and not shipping. I was going to do a cross with silkies until I found her, thank God for BYC! I shouldn't spend that much $ on birds cause I defiantly am not rich, but we all have to have a hobby and I've spent more on less. Heck some people spend that much on coffee at the gas station within a couple months, I don't. I hope I only have to buy them once. Hell we paid $350 for our dog at a shelter, and I'm not going to get any meat or eggs out of him Lol! don't plan on making $ off them, just want to have a flock of fibro meat birds, don't think I will sell any of them, I want to eat them!
     
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  8. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    It is pretty steep money for some cross bred chickens, but folks drop that much on a meal out as you've pointed out. The prices I had seen mentioned for the black birds earlier in the thread were those I was referring to...hundreds or thousands of dollars for a black chicken. Unless a bite or two of that meat would cure cancer, I'm thinking P. T. Barnum would be right proud of those breeders.

    I could be just whistling Dixie here but unless a person's whole lifestyle was geared towards cancer prevention~diet, exercise, environment, etc., eating this chicken isn't going to make any significant difference in one's health, even if I believed that black chicken meat had that much health potential.
     
  9. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    People like to play and experiment. There is nothing wrong with that. I did it for years, and still do on a different level. Some might become interested in real breeding. Most will not, but occasionally one will. I wish more would, because that is where the fun is. In the attempt to "perfect" something.

    It is easy to start something. A 12 year old kid can cross this with that to see what happens. I know because I did. I tried things with feed store chicks. In the spring I was cutting grass to buy chicks, chicken wire, and chicken feed. I always thought I was doing something, but I wasn't though. It was delusions of grandeur. LOL. Not to mention that it never lasted long.
    Things changed and I took a break. I started playing with colored pet store mice. It is amazing how many colors, patterns, fur types etc. you can isolate with some mixed up mice. I would identify them, and then get them breeding true. Then cross them to come up with something new. I played with increasing size, shrinking size etc. etc. You can get a lot of generations out of them annually, so you can accomplish a lot in a short period of time.

    When I bought my first piece of property at 20, I picked the chickens back up. "Rhode Island Reds" from Mcmurray. They were more like Reds then than they are now. I knew nothing of the internet, a Standard, or anything. I had my own ideal stamped in my head based on impressions. I had already learned the basic concepts and went to work. I had learned from observation the importance of culling, and to limit the amount of points of selection in a given year, etc.
    I decided that I wanted to try improving the carcass, and qty and size of eggs laid. There used to be deals where you could get free sex linked cockerels with a purchased bag of feed. I used a male to cross on my "reds". I ruined my type, lost size, but the offspring were excellent layers. I decided to go for a barred red bird, and keep "my ideals" starting with a black sex linked male. After a few generations, I learned that red is not a good color for barring.
    Something I noticed was that the shorter wider birds were faster to flesh out so I emphasized it. I also came to prefer the lighter even colored reds. The black tails was a nice contrast etc. Still to this day my favorite colors are black tailed white, red, and buff.

    I ended up meeting an older man picking up cheaper feed out of town (there was no Tractor Supplies then LOL). He came and looked at my flock, and took some interest in me. I picked up a lot from him. Then I went to his place. He had the best Reds that I had ever seen at the time. They were not as dark as the exhibition strains are, but they had excellent type. The uniformity impressed me. Especially with the variability I had at home. I was only gradually figuring out what I liked. I did not even know anyone that had chickens before him. I had a mixed up bunch concerning type, and his were like peas in a pod.

    He gave me some eggs if I promised not to cross them. I raised a batch out, and I was smitten. They did not lay quite as well as mine, but they had a better carcass. They were good layers though. The eggs were also a nice rich brown, and the eggs were uniform in shape and quality. This man culled eggs religiously, and now I do. Egg size and quality is still a big deal to me.
    I scrapped the birds I had realizing I had something that was worth something more. They were nice birds.

    About ten years ago when I moved where I am, I gave the flock away. I figured that I could get a new start. The old man passed away, his birds were gone, and the new owner of mine let his own dogs get to them. He replaced them with 10 dollar spent hens from a trader paper. Decades of that mans commitment to that fine flock was lost to history. I still regret what I did, or did not do.

    That is where I decided I was going to commit to a breed, and the added challenge that goes with it. I decided to go with NHs because they had the type that I come to appreciate and the color that I came to admire. The problem was that there was none that was worth anything to be had. Just junk scrawny poorly colored hatchery birds. They were not even NHs. They were only red. LOL.

    Now I have added the Catalana. I proved to myself that I can maintain something, and gradually improve something. I wanted a re building project that I could call my own. The fundamentals of the color was one I had become familiar with.
    I enjoy the challenge of the problems. I enjoy the challenge of the color, the feather, the comb, the tail, the vigor, the health, the type, the size, the egg qty/quality and size, etc. etc. 10 years from now, I want to have something that is worth something, and call it my own. I will know where they started.

    So I have been there. I can relate with both sides. I only decided to take a step forward concerning the challenge, and breed productive birds that have history and a Standard. I can still experiment, but the experiments are side mating hoping to improve what I am working on.
     
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  10. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    This is an old story played out over and again. Time will pass, interest will wane, and they will go back to obscurity as they were. Worth nothing more than any other chicken. If they continue to exist here at all, though I imagine they will. They were here before this import.

    I agree that the perceived health benefits are exaggerated. It is part of the story though. Part of the perceived value.

    They are an interesting breed, if some would preserve and improve them as they are. The problem is when the enthusiasm gets this high, it falls just as low.

    Maybe some here will do well by them, and have a vigorous healthy flock 10 years from now. Time will tell.
     

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