Can the chickens go with 24 hours/day lighting?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ChickenCharmer, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. ChickenCharmer

    ChickenCharmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    When my family goes on vacation, we move all the chickens to the basement, because we don't want to worry about depending on people to shut the chickens up, etc. The chickens stay unattended down there with automatic waterers and a filled feeder for as long as we're on vacation. Since its completely dark, we need lighting. My question is, is it okay for them to be down there with constant light, day and night, for as long as maybe 2 weeks?
     
  2. babymakes6

    babymakes6 Gifted

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    Why not use a timer for the lighting?
     
  3. ChickenCharmer

    ChickenCharmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    We did that last time, but it's very unreliable. Last time we went, the light just went off and stayed off, for reasons unknown. It completely goes out and stops working if the power goes out once. I'm pretty uneasy using it.
     
  4. babymakes6

    babymakes6 Gifted

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    Can you leave a light on in one part, and off in another part?
     
  5. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Wait - you're going to leave them unattended for two weeks? That sounds like an invitation for disaster. What if they knocked over their water, or ran out of feed? Is there anyone that could at least check on them in the basement for you every few days? Sorry - not trying to sound negative - but this is a bit worrisome...
     
  6. ginbart

    ginbart Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 9, 2008
    Bloomsburg, PA
    When Wal Mart had all the Christmas items out they had a timer and they may still carry them. I had to charge it for a day it has a battery in it so if your lights go out the battery will keep it going after the lights come back on. I'm not sure how to explain it. But if you check out the timers there it was $9.95. It was one you had to program so I guess what I'm saying is, it will keep what you programed it for if the lights go out. It doesn't lose it program once the lights go out. So say you want to turn the lights on from 8am to 6pm you would program that in the timer. Now your lights go out, 5 hours later your lights come on. The timer will still be set and the light will still come on at 8am and off at 6pm. Does that make sense?
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    It's not the constant light as much as the possibility of them turning over their water or it becoming too fouled to drink...or running out of feed if you miscalculate.
     
  8. mdbokc

    mdbokc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 22, 2009
    Oklahoma County, OK
    Use mechanical timers instead programmable ones and power blurps are a non-issue. I would never leave them two weeks w/o someone to look in on them. This is a disaster waiting to happen, imho. But it sounds like you did it before. Good luck.
     
  9. ChickenCharmer

    ChickenCharmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Okay, sure and all that, but can someone actually tell me if it's okay for them to be in 24 h/d light? I probably won't end up doing it, but I just want to know.
     
  10. ChickenCharmer

    ChickenCharmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:It is pretty risky, but putting all my trust in a neighbor is even more risky. See, my chickens run around free and then at dusk go into the coop, at which point I (or a neighbor) have to shut the doors against predators. We have predators coming at and occasionally before dusk, so it's imperative that someone is there to shut the doors. If the neighbors come late (very likely) it could be a total disaster, to say nothing of them forgetting to come at all. That, or the chickens stay in a completely predator-proof enclosure with automatic water and plenty of feed. If someone checks on them, they might not close the door properly, and I prefer not to put such risks on an untrustworthy person.
     

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