Chick start and grow and layena

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Easter eggers, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Easter eggers

    Easter eggers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How long can I feed chick start and grow after I'm supposed to switch to layena?
     
  2. Nic&Chickies

    Nic&Chickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You will get varying answers to this question on this forum.
    My answer, for my little ones, was to see how long the chick feed lasts, and then, if they have reached the age the package recommends, don't buy any more chick feed for them. If they start laying before it's gone, I'll be stumped! But it's getting low, and the youngest are now 18 weeks old.
    Now let's see if I figured out how to put a link to the thread I started when I asked a similar question last month: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=534010

    You can also do a search up in the right-hand corner: try "switch to layer feed" and see if gets you some advice.
     
  3. Kaelinstorm

    Kaelinstorm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ^ I do that. When they start getting to the age on the back of the bag, I stop buying it and go up a level when the feed runs out... Doesnt seem to harm them and I dont want to waste perfectly good feed [​IMG]
     
  4. AngelzFyre

    AngelzFyre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Usually they stay on the Start and Grow until 18 weeks, then either start them on Layena or Flock Raiser and provide free choice Oyster Shell and Granite grit. They need the Oyster Shell for calcium and should start laying anywhere from the 18 week mark to 6 months..some of the larger breeds may even take longer than that to mature.
     
  5. Wisher1000

    Wisher1000 Bama Biddy

    At about 16 weeks, I buy layer and start mixing it in with the starter until the starter is gone. Then when they start showing signs of laying (darker comb, nest inspections, singing) I give them access to oyster shell.
     
  6. bertman

    bertman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for that comment, wisher1000. I was about to ask if it is okay to mix the starter and the layer since I have about five pounds of starter left but the girls are now 19 weeks old.
     
  7. BoltonChicken

    BoltonChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Usually they stay on the Start and Grow until 18 weeks, then either start them on Layena or Flock Raiser and provide free choice Oyster Shell and Granite grit. They need the Oyster Shell for calcium and should start laying anywhere from the 18 week mark to 6 months..some of the larger breeds may even take longer than that to mature.

    Absolutely what Purina suggest. I would prefer Flock Raiser with the free choice Oyster Shell and Granite grit, as Layena contains calcium, which some say is not good for the Roos.

    At about 16 weeks, I buy layer and start mixing it in with the starter until the starter is gone. Then when they start showing signs of laying (darker comb, nest inspections, singing) I give them access to oyster shell.

    Also very good advice. Mixing what you have left over will not cause any problems.​
     
  8. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    I have come to not to believe a feed Mfg. that stated a age when to switch to a layer.
    Chicken will mature differently by breed, environment, and weather or not there are from a hatchery or a good breeder.
    You shouldn't feed Layer type feed to any bird that is not laying they don't need the extra Calcium and you can be doing more harm than good.

    Here is the feeding recommendations from Buckeye Nutrition and what they print on there 17% Complete Laying Crumbles
    FEEDING DIRECTIONS: Feed as the sole ration to laying hens. Maintain a clean, fresh supply of
    water, oyster shells, and grit to the birds at all times. Keep the birds in a clean, dry environment with
    about 2 square feet of floor space per bird in a laying house along with adequate nesting locations.
    Hens in production should consume approximately 22 to 25 pounds of Buckeye[​IMG] 16% Prosperity
    Layer Feed per day for every 100 birds in the laying house. Begin feeding Buckeye[​IMG] 16% Prosperity
    Layer Feed as soon as the first eggs appear in the laying house.
    The birds will require 14 to 16 hours of
    light to reach normal egg production. Do not allow the lights to be on continuously so as to cause
    excessive stress on the birds. Buckeye[​IMG] 15% Pullet Grower Crumbs are recommended for immature
    birds or for birds, which are not in egg production because of the lower calcium in the pullet grower
    diet. Lighter breeds such as leghorns should be fed Buckeye[​IMG] 17% Complete Layer Crumbs or
    Buckeye[​IMG] 18% Layer-Breeder Pellets when feed consumption is less than 22 pounds per hundred
    birds and when egg production is in excess of 75%. The reason for this is that Buckeye[​IMG] 17% Complete
    Layer Crumbs and 18% Layer-Breeder Pellets contains more protein and are more energy dense.


    Chris
     

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