Chicken poop for vegetable gardens?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Beka123, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. Beka123

    Beka123 Out Of The Brooder

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    I know this isn't the right section of the forum for this question but i couldn't find a section that sounded like the "right" one to me, so sorry!

    But I was wondering, I know chicken poop is high in ammonia so I'm curious, what is the proper ratio of chicken poop (per foot or yard or something) for a veg garden so I don't burn up all my plants? Going to put in a raised garden bed this Saturday, so it will either be 8x8 or 8x16, depending on how ambitious I feel on that day haha!
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Chicken litter is ideal for a garden. However, the window for applying it to the garden, for this year, has just about closed in most places in the US. Raw manure should only be applied in the fall and winter, after the garden has been harvested. Manure should no longer be applied once you are within 60 days of your planting date. It is almost March, so make careful note of how much time remains before your planting date. The issue is much more about pathogens than it is about ammonia. Here's a simple, clear explanation.

    http://umaine.edu/publications/2510e/

    You can always compost the manure for applying next fall/winter.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  3. Beka123

    Beka123 Out Of The Brooder

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    That was a great website thank you for the info. I had no idea about the raw manure thing. I have read that sheep poop "can be directly applied to gardens" and I always wondered about that, I thought "can't you always apply leaf eating poop to garden soil?" lol guess i know now! That saddens me though, it's going to be harder to find the right kind of manure now. Thanks again!
     
  4. CSWolffe

    CSWolffe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I compost mine. I have a lovely little three bin compost system, where I add to a bin for a year, let it cook for a year, and then harvest the following. That breaks down most of harmful chemicals, and the only bacteria in it at that point are beneficial ones. I use pine shavings in my coop, which provide a great source of carbon(composting requires nitrogen and carbon), so I could easily compost just the sweepings from the coop and get wonderfully rich compost.
     
  5. Beka123

    Beka123 Out Of The Brooder

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    My mom told me that the pine needles from our pine trees are good for the soil, would pine needles work the same way as pine shavings in my compost pile? I have basically a carpet of pine needles in my front yard, even when I mow I can't get rid of those pesky pointy things.
     
  6. Beka123

    Beka123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oops lol. Posted twice
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  7. CSWolffe

    CSWolffe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would you girls enjoy walking on those pointy things? Probably not. Compost em, don't use em in the run. But realize that pine needles are highly acidic, so only use them in compost intended for plants that enjoy acidic soil, like strawberries. I love to go to my mother's house and rake up a bag or two of pine needles just for my strawberry patch. Come to think of it, she doesn't mind either...
     
  8. Beka123

    Beka123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh no I have hay in their coop and nest boxes, I would just put the pine needles in my compost pile. Thanks for the info, I am getting strawberries this year, that will be perfect!
     
  9. Juise

    Juise Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have heard that if you just let the chicken poo "rest" a year that it is fine then to put on your garden as is.

    As to what to add for composting, dried grass clippings, straw, dry leaves, etc. will all work, too.
     
  10. CSWolffe

    CSWolffe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you let your chicken poo rest in a pile with all the straw and pine shavings, it will naturally compost in the richest, most wonderful dark compost you could ever get.
    You should let it 'rest' for six months to a year if you are going to put it on your veggies within six months of harvesting. Chicken poo has salmonella, and you need to let it die off and let other, more beneficial bacteria take its place.
     

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