Chickens have heat stroke

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
1,031
887
211
New Jersey
My almost 3-month-old chickens are getting heat stroke more often now because of the hot weather and there coop is always like 90 degrees on the inside. Anybody have ideas on what to do?
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,531
10,926
611
North Florida
Are they getting actual heatstroke, or are they just exhibiting heat stress? Both are important to deal with, but heat stroke is an emergency that may result in death and needs to be dealt with immediately. Pictures of your coop might help. It sounds like it probably needs more ventilation. I'm in Florida where it gets very hot and humid for most of the summer, so I'm well acquainted with all the issues. I have lots of openings on my coop for air to flow and I have fans in the windows and one in the rafters to help with air exchange and movement. Hosing off the roof of your coop several times a day in the worst of the heat may help cool it, it depends on your construction and materials. You can put frozen water bottles in waterers to help keep the water cool for them, and change them out as needed. Do they have shady places they can go? I have trees, shrubs, the side of a barn and a sun shade sail hung to give them shady places to rest. Shallow dishes, like plant saucers, filled with water can help, they can stand in them to help cool off (caution with young chicks, you don't want them to drown). Misters may be a help to cool the area. Box fans set up where they can't get to them, like on the other side of fencing, to help move the air. Frozen watermelon, or blocks of ice with herbs and berries frozen in them can help them cool off.
For actual heat stroke, if you have a bird that is exhibiting serious signs, I keep a bucket of water in the shade that is ready, and they get dunked to cool them off rapidly. I have only had to do it once. I also bring older birds into the air conditioning for periods on the hottest days if they need it. Actual heatstroke can mean seizures, organ failure, brain damage, etc. Prevention is much better than treatment as heat stroke can progress to death very rapidly, so I work hard at not having it happen. When I see them panting or holding wings out, I ramp up my measures to help them cool off. Electrolites can be helpful, but they should not be given all the time. I will use them, usually not daily and only for 1-3 days at a stretch, and usually I put them out in the morning and then 4-6 hours later I switch to plain fresh water. I lost a pullet last summer to heat stroke, she also had early fatty liver disease which was found at necropsy. Her core body temperature, if I remember correctly, was about 112 degrees, so it's no joke.
https://www.vetpoultry.com/blogs/ba...pot-signs-and-prevent-heat-stress-in-chickens
https://www.raising-happy-chickens.com/heat-exhaustion-in-chickens.html
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
1,031
887
211
New Jersey
Are they getting actual heatstroke, or are they just exhibiting heat stress? Both are important to deal with, but heat stroke is an emergency that may result in death and needs to be dealt with immediately. Pictures of your coop might help. It sounds like it probably needs more ventilation. I'm in Florida where it gets very hot and humid for most of the summer, so I'm well acquainted with all the issues. I have lots of openings on my coop for air to flow and I have fans in the windows and one in the rafters to help with air exchange and movement. Hosing off the roof of your coop several times a day in the worst of the heat may help cool it, it depends on your construction and materials. You can put frozen water bottles in waterers to help keep the water cool for them, and change them out as needed. Do they have shady places they can go? I have trees, shrubs, the side of a barn and a sun shade sail hung to give them shady places to rest. Shallow dishes, like plant saucers, filled with water can help, they can stand in them to help cool off (caution with young chicks, you don't want them to drown). Misters may be a help to cool the area. Box fans set up where they can't get to them, like on the other side of fencing, to help move the air. Frozen watermelon, or blocks of ice with herbs and berries frozen in them can help them cool off.
For actual heat stroke, if you have a bird that is exhibiting serious signs, I keep a bucket of water in the shade that is ready, and they get dunked to cool them off rapidly. I have only had to do it once. I also bring older birds into the air conditioning for periods on the hottest days if they need it. Actual heatstroke can mean seizures, organ failure, brain damage, etc. Prevention is much better than treatment as heat stroke can progress to death very rapidly, so I work hard at not having it happen. When I see them panting or holding wings out, I ramp up my measures to help them cool off. Electrolites can be helpful, but they should not be given all the time. I will use them, usually not daily and only for 1-3 days at a stretch, and usually I put them out in the morning and then 4-6 hours later I switch to plain fresh water. I lost a pullet last summer to heat stroke, she also had early fatty liver disease which was found at necropsy. Her core body temperature, if I remember correctly, was about 112 degrees, so it's no joke.
https://www.vetpoultry.com/blogs/ba...pot-signs-and-prevent-heat-stress-in-chickens
https://www.raising-happy-chickens.com/heat-exhaustion-in-chickens.html
omg thank you and I think they had heat stress idk. they were panting and holding out their wings. I was getting them to drink water and I was trying my best to cool them off. I'll try to get some pics of the coop
 

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