Choosing a White egg layer breed

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Cheapchicksfarm, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Cheapchicksfarm

    Cheapchicksfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 23, 2010
    I raise several breeds or large fowl but none are white egg layers and I often have request for them so I want to add a large fowl white egg breed to my farm but there are so many options and I prefer to get info from people who raise them verses catalogs trying to sell only their good points so please give me your honest opinions of any white egg laying breed [​IMG] here are the traits I look for in my breeds when adding to the farm

    Hardiness- I like tough birds who can handle changes in diet, housing or seasons without getting sick or dropping dead [​IMG] I have nice houses and don't often change to much but I do not have the patience for really fragile breeds
    High Fertility and Hatchabilty- I require at least 75% fertility without feather trimming and do not like the breeds that die in the egg if a bird of one gene is crossed with another (example the crested ducks have a fatal gene which kills off many of the embryos so I will never raise them)
    Fast Growing- I like fast to medium growers I don't like breeds that grow in slow motion
    Eggs- I need white eggs not tinted and would like them to be of good size
    Rate of Lay- I need a breed that will lay a good amount of eggs I love the fancier breeds but they do not lay enough I would like to have a breed that will lay enough eggs to make it worth the time and feed since I no longer show my birds
    Color- I can not have a solid white bird since every time I get one the hawks carry them away

    Meat production is not required in the white layer breed I choose and I don't mind waiting for them to reach sexual maturity to lay eggs also not to worried about if they will or will not go broody
    I am not trilled with flighty birds but since most white egg breeds are flighty I can deal with it if I have to [​IMG]

    I like the Anaconas and Dorkings but know nothing about them

    I look forward to any replys [​IMG]
     
  2. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Apr 24, 2011
    Roanoke VA
    well, on the virginia thread i mentioned my fondness for dorkings, but they don't fit all of your requirements... they are hardy and deal well with everything going on around here, but they lay a medium to large egg and are not considered fast growying by any means. hens will start laying by about 25-30 weeks, but most (roosters especially) don't reach their full size until 18-24 months old..

    I'm getting good hatch rates from my birds, they are laid back and mellow. it seems like they fit some of your requirements but not all... the reds tend to lay more tinted/pale brown eggs, while the silver greys lay more white or slightly off white... they are considered a meaty bird, more dual purpose i guess. and i pretty much get 3-4 eggs during the winter and 4-5 eggs a week during the summer (except when broodies happen).
     
  3. Cheapchicksfarm

    Cheapchicksfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 23, 2010
    At what age would the cockerels be worth processing? for a 3.5 to 4 lb processed bird? Are they like Jersey Giants who grow bone first and then at a much later age fill out with meat? I read in some threads they are fragile but I guess you do not feel that way. If I get Dorkings I want the Silvers I have always liked that color the best
     
  4. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Apr 24, 2011
    Roanoke VA
    i usually hold off processing until between 4-6 months old. by then i can gauge the size and type. but they continue putting on size until at least 8 months old, then the growth tapers off a bit, tho my 2 year old boy did grow a good bit in the last year.

    sorry, i can't say how large the processed birds are, but at 7 months old i'd estimate Thing2 (my red cockerel) is maybe 5.5 pounds, while my 2 year old sg is about 7 pounds or so. not quite up to SOP standards, but the breed has been neglected for years.
     

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