"Clayback" Genetics

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Vcomb, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Vcomb

    Vcomb Chillin' With My Peeps

    913
    9
    143
    Aug 19, 2008
    South Dakota
    My Coop
    I'm curious to see what the genetics gurus here think about this bird's color:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This bird (and a few others) came out of a line of American gamefowl (H.H. Moore Clarets that had an infusion of Lowman Whitehackle many decades ago). The line this bird came out of breeds pretty true to color and these are the first ones that came out this way. I suspect they are the result of a recessive trait or maybe a group of recessives. These birds do not belong to me but rather a friend, I'm posting them here for discussion and more info.

    Here's the mom of the above bird, she is typical of the color of the females of this line:

    [​IMG]

    A typical male of the line, the father of these "claybacks" was a lighter (more lemon) hackled bird"

    [​IMG]


    This line has also produced spangleds:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Here's some vid stills of about the only other bird I've seen come this color and I have virtually no info on this bird other than it is unrelated to the line of Clarets above (these stills are of a Bobby Boles Asil):

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    It'll be interesting to see what light might be shed on this color
     
  2. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

    11,005
    434
    328
    Jun 1, 2009
    Ohio
    V,

    They almost look like a Spangled that is starting to "Pyle".

    Chris
     
  3. upthecreek

    upthecreek Chillin' With My Peeps

    855
    9
    151
    Mar 18, 2009
    South Alabama
    I'm no guru of any kind but i've been in game fowl for over 59 years .
    What we get out of our fowl is what's in them .

    Shannon Nelson
    South Alabama
     
  4. Vcomb

    Vcomb Chillin' With My Peeps

    913
    9
    143
    Aug 19, 2008
    South Dakota
    My Coop
    Chris,

    At a glance I'd agree but what is strange is that it doesn't affect the tail from what I can tell and instead of masking the color is is restricting it down to teardrop shaped ends. To me the most striking thing about it is that it affects the shoulders and back.



    Quote: Shannon,

    I agree which is why I asked him what he knew about the Lowmans, but he said they went into this line way before he even got ahold of them.
     
  5. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

    11,005
    434
    328
    Jun 1, 2009
    Ohio
    By chance are these Slipspur's birds?

    Chris
     
  6. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,759
    37
    183
    Nov 29, 2008
    Groesbeek Netherlands
    They are hen colored wheaten based. Very interesting, and not ugly... ;)
     
  7. Vcomb

    Vcomb Chillin' With My Peeps

    913
    9
    143
    Aug 19, 2008
    South Dakota
    My Coop
    Yep they are Slip's. I asked him if he minded me posting he said go for it.

    So Henk you are saying they are taking after the hen's coloration but are not fully displaying it and are maintaining the male's plumage structure? I plan to ask him to take pics of any chicks from these birds this year to see what they look like, see if anything appears to be unusual.
     
  8. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,759
    37
    183
    Nov 29, 2008
    Groesbeek Netherlands
    Yes, that is my theory.
     
  9. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

    11,005
    434
    328
    Jun 1, 2009
    Ohio
    I thought they might be, I thought I remembered seein Slip post some birds like these.

    Chris
     
  10. Vcomb

    Vcomb Chillin' With My Peeps

    913
    9
    143
    Aug 19, 2008
    South Dakota
    My Coop
    Ok so do you guys suspect this is a recessive trait, a mutation or a combination of traits? I talked to another guy who got the clayback's uncle and some hens of the same line. He too, has had some of them pop up in his Clarets. BUT what I find interesting is he also had one or two come out this color when crossed onto another bloodline that was unrelated (some roundheads).

    The other guy (Jaber) told me that they can't really be identified until they are almost reaching maturity and have their adult colors.

    Any thoughts? Slipspur told me he no longer has the mother to the claybacks, she was killed by a predator but he suspects the broodcock might be producing them since his brother produced some of the other guy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by