Damn Quail!!!

TheDawg

Formerly KDOGG331
Premium Feather Member
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Jan 18, 2008
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They do have the best dust bath in the world and love using it.

Their behavior really is no different than almost any fowl. It's just that any fowl I previously had were to lay eggs. I never even thought about stopping egg laying with fowl. I know you cannot eliminate it, but I am sure that it can be mitigated.
Hmm I’m not sure then! Just out of curiosity, why do you want to eliminate the egg laying? Do you think it’s causing the crazy behavior? The broodiness? If anything, laying made my birds calmer. And most of mine never go broody. Though that’s chickens but still. I have Cots too. All were flighty until after they started laying and laying calmed them down. So I can’t imagine stopping it would make yours any calmer. It might just be their particular personalities.
 

muddy75

20 days til Spring!! 🌸 and til a new title! 🤣
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Aug 17, 2018
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If I’m understanding correctly, you are interested in breaking the broody behavior. To do this, remove the fake eggs and any nest material. You will have to collect any new eggs and attempts at a new nest frequently before they attempt to brood them. Restricting their light and/or changing their environment would be the only options to delay/decrease the frequency of laying new eggs.
 

gwboolean

In the Brooder
Jun 14, 2019
19
16
34
Hmm I’m not sure then! Just out of curiosity, why do you want to eliminate the egg laying? Do you think it’s causing the crazy behavior? The broodiness? If anything, laying made my birds calmer. And most of mine never go broody. Though that’s chickens but still. I have Cots too. All were flighty until after they started laying and laying calmed them down. So I can’t imagine stopping it would make yours any calmer. It might just be their particular personalities.

No, I am just tired of it. But yes, their behavior is entirely hormonal. It's a direct relationship.

So any effort to mitigate egg laying (probably not possible except by taking their ovaries out) is to define what actions drive the hormones.
 

gwboolean

In the Brooder
Jun 14, 2019
19
16
34
If I’m understanding correctly, you are interested in breaking the broody behavior. To do this, remove the fake eggs and any nest material. You will have to collect any new eggs and attempts at a new nest frequently before they attempt to brood them. Restricting their light and/or changing their environment would be the only options to delay/decrease the frequency of laying new eggs.
That's kind of what I thought. I already pulled their nests and they are both wandering around and haven't yet noticed it. Should I expect a lot of mournful button quail calls or button quail bitching for the next day or two?
 

TheDawg

Formerly KDOGG331
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Jan 18, 2008
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Massachusetts
No, I am just tired of it. But yes, their behavior is entirely hormonal. It's a direct relationship.

So any effort to mitigate egg laying (probably not possible except by taking their ovaries out) is to define what actions drive the hormones.
I don’t think the egg laying is the problem but rather the broodiness. I think if you can break the broodiness, it will solve it. Broodies can be quite temperamental and b*tchy but once they break that they’re fine even if they lay.
 

007Sean

Becoming Ridiculously Awesome
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Removing their nests and collecting the eggs may break their broodiness, as @muddy75 mentioned.

I kept some of mine in a darkened room, not even ambient sunlight nor incandescent light, (I did add VitD3 to their feed for that reason) but even under those conditions they continued to lay eggs and although their broodiness was diminished, occasionally they would try brooding a clutch, if I didn't remove the eggs fast enough....although they are pets, you might consider rehoming them if you can't/won't just accept their behavior or break them of their behavior.

ETA-They will still call for a mate but the hens call isn't nearly as loud or scary as the males.
 
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Quail 66

Songster
Nov 18, 2020
187
271
133
Thessaloniki, Greece
Exchange them with Italian quails. If you manage to turn them broody too, please send them to me 🤣. Seriously now, maybe it's time for a change. Give them away and keep a hamster. They need about the same space I think. Post some pics from your cage.
 

Quailobsessed

Crowing
Oct 12, 2019
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Australia
My king quails go broody all the time! They're pretty much constantly broody. I have a group of three females (mother and daughters) who always go broody, but become aggressive towards each other. Removing eggs and nests seems to be the best way.

I have since introduced a lone male to them who they all get along with, so there seems to be less fighting.
 

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