distended abdomen, labored breathing

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jennh, Apr 26, 2009.

  1. jennh

    jennh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2007
    Lititz
    Help ! I think this might be related to egg-laying, but I thought I'd tap the experts. Delilah, my golden-laced wyandotte, has a distended abdomen, and her breathing is labored. She was having a hard time walking. Her butt feathers were all pooped up yesterday, so I cleaned her off. Her downy feathers looked much better today. I DID see some mites, and her skin looked really sore. I put some Neosporin on to help heal her skin, and the oil from that killed the mites in that area. I know I will have to dust her. Anyway, does anyone have an idea as to her problem?
    Thanks!
    Jen
     
  2. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    When did she last lay? How old is she?

    Sounds like she might be eggbound. You might search the site for info, but my own first choice might be a warm sitz bath. It can help relax things and help an egg to pass, if this is indeed what it is.

    Please keep us posted on how she does.
     
  3. jennh

    jennh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2007
    Lititz
    Hi ! She is 3 yrs old. I'm not sure when she last laid, as I also have a silver-laced wyandotte. I think it has been within the last week, but I'm not sure. I really thought when I got up this morning, she'd be dead. She was not dead, was up, but not outside. She was drinking when I checked on her. I couldn't stay long--had to get to work. I'll let you know how she's doing ;o) Thanks for caring! [​IMG]

    Jen
     
  4. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 17, 2007
    New Jersey
    Since she is symptomatic, if eggbound she needs fast intervention or she can die from heart failure - get her to a vet if at all possible. I consider LABORED BREATHING an emergency.

    In less dire circumstances (no labored breathing), it may work to employ techniques advised on BYC if you search under "eggbound", including an approriate calcium supplement which I have been advised supplies musecle strength to push (in this emergency, administer a TUMS - crush in a bit of water and gently administer along her beak line with a dropper drop by drop so she can swallow on her own. That, and the bath.


    JJ
     
  5. jennh

    jennh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2007
    Lititz
    [​IMG] Well, I looked under the egg bound posts as someone suggested. I tried the oil bit. Delilah died. I don't know if I used too much oil, did I massage too hard? I feel like I killed her. But she was not herself, so-----

    Jen [​IMG]
     
  6. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Oh $#!&. I am so sorry about your hen. It did not sound good.

    Honestly, I am not sure you could have saved her, even with a vet's help. Please don't beat yourself up about this. Just keep moving and look after the rest of your feathered friends.

    [​IMG]

    Sending thoughts of peace and comfort - - - -
     
  7. Renee

    Renee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2008
    CALIFORNIA
    You didn't kill her.

    She was probably egg-bound for a while, since the mites had moved in on her. You did the best you could to save her, but it was probably just too late. It is hard to permanently cure hens who are prone to becoming egg-bound anyway.

    Sorry about your hen.

    Don't forget to dust the other hen for mites.
     

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