Do I Keep Hen's Wounds Bandaged?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jessica.anne, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. jessica.anne

    jessica.anne Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 21, 2011
    South Carolina Midlands
    One of my hens suffered a nasty wound under her wing from my roo being too frisky...it's pretty bad...an area about the size of a tennis ball is torn away down to her flesh. I cleaned it out with medicated wash and packed bag balm, the medicated ointment you use on livestock, into the wound and took an old baby onesie and fashioned it into a makeshift bird shirt/bandage deal. I basically stuck her wings through the arm holes and tied the loose ends in knots to keep it on. I put her in a dog crate to keep her seperated so she can heal and she's eating and drinking fine with her shirt on. Should I keep the wound covered? I'm worried about flies and maggots getting at the wound if I leave it uncovered. Also, I have both Pennicillin and Baytril, should I give her and injection? She's about 4lbs, so It's 1cc dosage, right? Where to I give her a shot at if I do give her one? I'm assuming in the breast? Any advice is appreciated. Thanks all!
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    You can use a product called Swat to keep flies out of it if that is a concern. The onesie is a good idea if it works, but I have never had any luck keeping bandages in place on birds unless I am using Vet Wrap, so I usually just forgo bandages. I would not give her an antibiotic unless the wound got infected. Antibiotic usage carries its own risks, so why take that risk unless you have to. Chickens are very resilient and can heal some impressive wounds with no intervention. If you do need to use the antibiotic, use the penicillin and the dose is 1 cc. in either the breast or thigh. You will need to rotate the sites to prevent muscle damage. But if you use the antibiotic you will need to follow it up with a couple week course of probiotics to keep her GI system in good working order. You can give small quantities of yogurt or buttermilk a few times a day for that.

    I hope this helps. Good luck with her.
     
  3. jessica.anne

    jessica.anne Out Of The Brooder

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    1
    24
    Dec 21, 2011
    South Carolina Midlands
    Thanks for your reply. Just went and checked on Penny, my wounded girl, and she's up and alert, eating and drinking...wearing a onesie with an American Flag on it. :)
    I hope the makeshift bandage works long enough to get some healing done. I'm one of those people who's going to fret and worry like I'm not doing enough for her. I was nervous tending to her because she's not very friendly and has been known to give you a nasty peck, but that's how I knew something was happening that I couldn't see, because she came walking up the back steps and layed at my feet. So I know she's hurting.
    How will I know if infection sets in? I'm assuming the area will be angry looking and hot to the touch? I hate to sound stupid, but chickens are pretty new to me and I know birds show illness different than a lot of other animals.
    Thanks again!
     
  4. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    It will get hot, red and "angry-looking" as you said, but it will also get really weepy and oozing. It is going to get weepy anyways, but if you note a sudden increase in that then she has an infection. She could also start to get lethargic and go off her feed, although this is not a sure thing.

    You have done everything just as I would have done it. I hope she heals up quickly and goes back to being her normal ornery self. You may note a personality change after this whole ordeal, though. I had a wounded hen who had to live in my house for a couple months. She was a flighty freak before her injury, but became quite a docile, friendly girl after.
     

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