Effective Treatments for Common Conditions of Chickens by Owners

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Lady of McCamley, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm interested in starting a conversation thread about effective treatments for common maladies that owners can perform on their own chickens without resorting to a vet (if at all possible).

    In case you haven't heard, the FDA has been very busy in removing many common drugs from the over the counter market (ie your feed store) which were once used to treat illnesses in animals in the food chain (chickens, swine, cattle).

    It has been largely directed at antibiotics, but that has swept towards others as well.

    Here is the list of upcoming restrictions. You will now need a Veterinary prescription to obtain drugs on this list.

    http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary...ce/JudiciousUseofAntimicrobials/ucm390429.htm

    I am heartbroken to see on that list Hygromycin B, the last and only approved wormer for layers. (This is important if you sell eggs to offset your feed cost).

    There as well is Tylan/Tylosin and Tetracycline and Oxytetracyline and Sulmet (sulphamethazine).

    I know many buy and use off label (with caution and care and adequate pull times), but that will become much more difficult now as many of these products will simply be off the shelves. Some feed stores have back stock, but legality of selling it is now in question, and back stock will deplete rapidly.

    So what are we to do if a bird legitimately gets sick or acquires a malady?

    Obviously good husbandry is always the first line of defense, but most small backyard holders simply do not have the field rotation to prevent the inevitable build up of worms and oocysts (coccidiosis), let alone the song birds and critters that track things in.

    And, most small backyard holders do not have the dollars to run to the vet for every small thing like a simple puncture wound on a hen that starts looking ugly or seasonal worming!

    Sadly, for many, it is very difficult to find a local vet willing or knowledgeable about treating chickens. (Vet schools are geared to commercial treatment which is generally to cull...at least when my daughter was working her way through Vet Tech school a few years back.) So many of us chicken owners are on our own.

    What do you plan to do?

    What treatments, herbal or otherwise, have shown to be truly effective? I'm interested in evidenced based facts rather than just grandpa's anecdotal stories (though old farmers can definitely teach us a thing or two) or an assumption that "it must be working" as "I've never had a problem."

    Unfortunately the "natural" and "herbal" market is rife with a lot of very expensive products that are honestly, pretty ineffective "snake oil.".

    Please tell us what you use, some evidence that shows it truly is effective, and how you treat with it.

    Please keep all conversations friendly, honest, and with the intent to be helpful (not sell your product nor argue over ideologies...ie natural only or vet only).

    Thank you for your input and hopefully a collective pool of helpful and accurate knowledge.

    Lady of McCamley

    @casportpony

    @TwoCrows

    @donrae

    @Eggcessive

    @aart

    @sourland

    @drumstick diva

    @lazy gardener

    @Ridgerunner

    @fisherlady

    @Egghead_Jr
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
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  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I don't use meds, so not concerned about the ban.

    The only chemical I use is permethrin for lice,
    have used vitamins/electrolyte solution for heat stroke,
    and do have corrid on hand, since starting chooks 3 years ago, in case of cocci(never had to use it tho).

    As requested, I will not cite my ideology regarding the misapplication of 'meds' or meds vs 'natural remedies'.
     
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  3. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Thank you aart.

    How do you treat, if you treat, for worms...in prevention or response to obvious infestation.
    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Is the injectable Tylan affected, or just the water soluble type?
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm not sure. See the list from the FDA or go to the manufacturer website or an online supply company.

    My guess is yes. The FDA wants all antibiotics to be vet script.

    @casportpony do you know?
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  7. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Time will tell how this antibacterial ban goes with private chicken keeping, at least for those that do not or can not use a vet for what ever reason. I personally have stocked up on a few common antibacterial drugs just in case....(Baytril, Amoxicillin, PenG, Doxycycline and Duramycin). Of course these will expire at some point and I have them stored properly for now.

    Preventative medicine goes a long way in keeping chickens healthy and that goes not only for what they eat and drink, but their environment as well. Clean feed, clean water, lots of space, low stress and good foraging territory. However some birds are genetically prone to certain diseases, they may have weak immune systems from the start or your environment may pose a threat from certain bacterial, yeast or parasite infestations. I for one have a very alkaline soil which harbors yeasts like mad, we have hoards of wild White Winged Doves which are known to carry Canker and Coccidiosis, both of which have been devastating on migrating wild bird populations here in the west, New Mexico especially, the fore mentioned Doves have become immune to these issues. I am sure every territory has it's issues...some places are loaded with mites, Round Worms or Mareks, some may be overloaded with yeasts, Canker and Coccidiosis.

    However there comes a time in all chicken keepers life that a bird gets an internal infection of some sort whether that be from internal laying or reproductive cancer, oviduct infections are common along with E.coli infections. I am not sure any natural product will address these properly enough to rid the bird of internal bacterial infections, I have used Oregano Oil in the past and have found it is a mild killer of intestinal bacteria and yeast. Of course we have all heard of Apple Cider Vinegar. It is a wonderful tonic/preventative to sour up the intestinal tract, making it a less desirable environment for bacteria, yeast and worms, but it won't kill off an infestation or infection properly.

    After having so many outbreaks of yeast, canker and cocci from my environment, I have found that Acidified Copper Sulfate is a wonderful thing to use on the flock. It is not something to be abused and can be poisonous if not used properly, but it will kill off gummy crops, sour crops, Canker, Coccidiosis, many species of intestinal worms, harmful yeasts and E.coli infections of the intestinal tract. Copper Sulfate is used in all animal feeds and supplements (with the exception of feed for sheep) as a source of Copper. However when given in higher doses, it's heavy metal properties kills off most pathogens, bacterias, fungi, yeasts, parasites, protozoa and other things susceptible to Copper at toxic levels. It is used for a short period of time in the flocks water, the Acidified type has absorbic acid and lemon added for good taste. I have used this with great success.

    Some of the more common of things that afflict chickens and poultry are Canker, worms, Coccidiosis, crop issues from yeasts, E.coli infections and all of these can be treated with Acidified Copper Sulfate and it is not on the list of antibacterial drugs being removed from the common man's market. So I do suggest we all keep a supply of Acidified Copper Sulfate on hand.

    https://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/acidified_copper_sulfate.html

    https://www.twincitypoultrysupplies...2fba44acb340c1&keyword=Copper+Sulfate&x=0&y=0

    All we can do at this point is keep our birds as healthy as possible with supplements, the use of probiotics and Apple Cider Vinegar for good intestinal health (which is where most pathogens take hold...a healthy oxygenated gut will ward off many harmful ailments) give our birds lots of space in and of the coop and never over crowd, clean water every day, fresh feed every day, lots of greens, clean coops and runs, outdoor time year round. And give our birds an occasional exam..checking feet pads for wear and tear, bodies for mites and lice, morning crop checks for emptiness, evening crop checks for fullness, comb color, poop inspection for color and consistency, blood, lash eggs, etc... (yes, get down there and look at it...and cecal poop that does not smell can indicate a sick bird) keep track of the weight of each bird and keep a record, etc....

    And don't discredit herbal treatments. As I mentioned, Oregano Oil is a powerful natural antibacterial/antifungal. Ginger is great for yeast infections, liver disease, helps with nausea and draws blood into the intestines. Hawthorn is a wonderful treatment for arterial hypertension and heart failure/valve conditions in older birds as well. Cinnamon is also a great additive for preventing yeast infections and helps to increase circulation. ACV helps to also increase appetite in birds that may be off their feed.

    I wish everyone the best of health in their flocks in these coming years and I am most grateful we all have a place we can come to, BYC, and help one another out with our birds. I for one would be lost without all of you. I can't tell you how thankful I am for all I have learned from so many of you!! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
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  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Tylan Soluble Powder has been Rx for quite some time now, but the injectable is still available OTC, but it's not "labeled" labeled for use in poultry.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    @aart , what's the link for that place that does fecals?

    -Kathy
     
  10. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    @TwoCrows

    Excellent information. I presume you get the Copper Sulfate from the feed store? Do you follow a pull time for eggs?

    My recurring problem has been worms and suspicion of mild coccidiosis.

    I add the ACV into water, and try to keep clean grounds, but on 1/3 acre after 6 plus years, build up is inevitable especially with Oregon's typical milder winters and wetter seasons. (I laugh at removing "puddles" from your area....uh, I'd have to leave Oregon.)

    Thank you for your valuable input.

    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
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