Egg production...does it improve??

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by chicks4kids, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. chicks4kids

    chicks4kids Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2009
    Northern Indiana
    So I have a pair of India Blue peafowl.

    I had a male I had come across in March -here's the thread.... https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=465980 whom I quickly named Rescue Pete. After treating him and nursing him through some very rough days I fell in love with him. Once I knew he was going to "live through the night" (thanks to the wonderful people on here) and make a recovery I went on a quest to find him a companion-and I did. A peahen just a couple estimated months older than him and she was due to start laying this past spring. This season Penelope layed 13 eggs. This is her first year laying.

    My question is if she will lay more next year or is this somewhat near the number of eggs she will lay every year?? They seem very happy together. I have a 10x12x8 coop with a 12x32x8 foot run for them. I'm hoping for peachicks next year, but I checked his fertility this year and it was a no go. I know 2 years seems to be the magic number, but I'm wondering if peahen tend to lay more eggs as their age progresses??

    Thanks in advance!! [​IMG]
     
  2. Kedreeva

    Kedreeva Longfeather Lane

    2,219
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    Jun 10, 2010
    Michigan
    It really depends on her age and your environmental and nutrition conditions. If she was just two years and he was just two years, it's very nice that she laid at all, and is fairly normal that he either wasn't fertile or wasn't impressive enough to catch her eye. Peahens generally lay throughout their breeding season (as early as april, as late as august, usually a shorter time between the two) and they lay only one egg every 2-3 days and they will stop once they have a clutch gathered. They can continue to lay if you remove the eggs you find and she is not allowed to collect a clutch- but be aware that this can be stressful on her body and she should be provided plenty of protein and calcium during this time.
     

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