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Egg shells or no?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Meggies Eggs, Sep 28, 2016.

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  1. Meggies Eggs

    Meggies Eggs Out Of The Brooder

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    Wondering what the general consensus is on feeding eggshells with kitchen scraps. I've heard mixed thoughts on this.
     
  2. Hens rule

    Hens rule Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feeding dried egg shells that are smashed into small pieces helps with calcium. Personally I don't like feeding kitchen scraps because of mold or causing impacted crops but its okay as long as its fresh and not rotten. You can feed smashed egg shell pieces as free choice in a bowl or mix it in their food.
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    All you will get on this is opinions. We all have our opinions based on our experiences or just what we’ve read. It’s natural they will be all over the board.

    I have no problems with cracking the eggs and tossing the shells directly in with the stuff that goes on the compost heap. I do not dry them, cook them, or crumble them. It has not lead to egg eating or any other problems. Most of the time my chickens don’t eat them anyway. They are getting enough calcium from other sources.

    I grew up with the same thing. During spring through fall when we butchered the hogs the egg shells were tossed in with other kitchen scraps and fed to the pigs. But after the hogs were butchered until we got new pigs in the spring, the egg shells and other kitchen scraps were tossed where the free ranging chickens could get to them. We never had an egg eater.

    Others will have different opinions based on whatever that opinion is based on. Nothing wrong with that. I suggest you do whatever you are comfortable with, dry them, cook them, crumble them or not. Form your own experiences. Then you will be as much of an expert on this topic as anyone else.
     
  4. ChkenKeeper

    ChkenKeeper Just Hatched

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    Personally I would stay away from feeding egg shells even if you crush them. It is not worth the time and effort crushing them and you still end up with pieces looking like egg shell. Unfortunately this can lead to your birds eating your eggs instead of you. It just is not worth that risk when you can buy crushed oyster shells which has a high concentration of calcium that builds strong eggs shells.
     
  5. americanchicks

    americanchicks Out Of The Brooder

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    I feed mine some on occasion, just crush them up and toss them into the scrambled eggs, if there are any leftover [​IMG]

    I had an egg eater in my first flock but it wasn't caused by an egg shell but a whole egg. One of the eggs had dropped and broke while we where gathering them. Of course the hens where on it quick as a blink, I didn't think anything of it. Of course once my RIR knew what was inside there was no stopping her. Ended up with eaten eggs and yoke all over the nest boxes. Lesson learned, if an egg drops in the pen PICK IT UP!
     
  6. americanchicks

    americanchicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 26, 2012
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    I feed mine some on occasion, just crush them up and toss them into the scrambled eggs, if there are any leftover [​IMG]

    I had an egg eater in my first flock but it wasn't caused by an egg shell but a whole egg. One of the eggs had dropped and broke while we where gathering them. Of course the hens where on it quick as a blink, I didn't think anything of it. Of course once my RIR knew what was inside there was no stopping her. Ended up with eaten eggs and yoke all over the nest boxes. Lesson learned, if an egg drops in the pen PICK IT UP!
     
  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    I find it no bother to give my egg shells to the chickens. If I have a compost bowl going, they get tossed in there. If chickens want those, they can help themselves in the compost. If I'm in the mood, I dedicate a bowl to egg shells, and when I am headed to the coop/run, I simply take the bowl along, toss the contents into the run, and do a little stomp dance on the shells. I agree with RR, that chickens on free range are not likely to bother with them. IMO, feeding egg shells is more likely to PREVENT your chickens from becoming egg eaters, b/c those egg shells are providing extra nutrient for the bird's diet. If they are lacking, the shells are more likely to be weak, which leads to accidental breakage. Broken eggs are ALWAYS eaten. It is the way of the chicken!
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I do rinse out my egg shells, dry and crush them...I mix in the oyster shell....I never feed my birds table scraps...If I wont eat it, why should they?
    I give fresh healthy snacks once or twice a week.....Just what I do....

    Cheers!
     
  9. chickensfinally

    chickensfinally Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just a thought on your comment. Chickens relish eating all sorts of things that I would not even consider. Mealworms, earthworms, mice, come readily to mind. Just because we would not eat it doesn't necessarily mean the chickens would not love having it.
     
    2 people like this.
  10. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Correct......Your not a Chicken.....Mine eat Frogs, grubs, seeds, dig in horse poop.....They do not raid my fridge for table scraps or the garbage....

    Cheers!
     
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