Eggs not hatching???

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Ctptcha, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. Ctptcha

    Ctptcha Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 15, 2013
    Hi guys,
    I have 9 pekin duck eggs in the incubator now, I candled them 2 days ago and it looked like they where day 28. I bought these eggs so I have no idea when they are supposed to hatch. My nine eggs haven't made a sound, haven't cracked the egg yet and they haven't even moved yet[​IMG]. Should I be worried? What should I do?[​IMG]
    Thanks!
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    So, you set the eggs in the incubator 28 days ago? When you candle them, do you see any movement?

    Its still possible that they may hatch. I'd give them a couple more days.
     
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  3. Ctptcha

    Ctptcha Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes, I do see movement, the eggs have been in the incubator 27 days ago but I'm sure eggs where already at least 1 day old when I whent to pick them up. Thank you so much for answering[​IMG]! I was getting really worried there...
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, good luck with the hatch! [​IMG] They may just be taking their time. Be prepared that, if they do hatch late, they may be a bit weaker and might need some extra care for the first few days.
     
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  5. Ctptcha

    Ctptcha Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, thanks! What type of extra care do you mean? I hope they hatch too![​IMG]
     
  6. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    They might take a little longer and need more encouragement to start eating/drinking. You may want to add electrolytes or sugar to the water for extra energy. You can also give some raw egg yolk by eyedropper if they don't eat on their own.
     
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  7. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Don't give up hope with them yet. Duck eggs hatch in 28 days under optimal conditions. If for some reason your incubator's temperature or humidity wasn't quite right, the eggs may have been delayed a little in development. If you see movement when you candle, then you know that they are alive. They may just hatch slower and be a little weaker when they're done hatching.

    Make sure you have a nice warm brooder ready, with easy access to feed and water. Vitamins/electrolytes in the water are always a good idea, since they give chicks/ducklings a great boost. Leave any ducklings that hatch in the incubator until they are 75% dry and fluffy, and then transfer them into the brooder.

    Good luck!
     
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  8. Ctptcha

    Ctptcha Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much guys [​IMG]! One last thing: I candled my eggs today and did not see any movement until after about five minutes. Should I help them out? Thanks again!!!
     
  9. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Times like this are when it comes down to personal preference. Some people say never to help a chick out, but I myself hate not trying to save every chick. If there is a chance a chick can make it, I help it out. If I were you, I would try to help one of your ducklings hatch. If they were okay, IMO, they should have hatched by now.

    Start by chipping into the air cell. If you do that, you'll be able to see if the duckling has internally pipped. If it has, consider leaving it alone. After some rest and more of an air supply, it may be able to hatch on its own. If the duckling hasn't internally pipped, keep going. Try to peel away the shell and shell membrane, being very careful about blood vessels. If it helps, moisten the shell membrane some water.

    If the duckling is ready to hatch, there should be very few blood-filled vessels, since most should have dried out/been absorbed. However, there are always a few blood vessels, and if you hit one of them, the duckling will start to bleed. While you're chipping away at the shell/membranes, occasionally put the egg back in the incubator to warm up. Get as much of the shell off the duckling as you can, and then leave it alone. If it is strong enough, it will work its way free shortly.

    Good luck!
     
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  10. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree with Bantamlover21; at this point, it comes down to personal choice. I, too, would be more likely to help them out than to leave them.

    Some people say you shouldn't help a chick out because if it can't get out on its own, it is probably naturally weak and won't live. This may be true in some cases. In other cases, it may not be the chick's (or duckling, in your case) fault that it can't get out. Improper incubation temperatures can cause delayed hatches which ruin a chick's ability to get out on its own. Wrong humidity can cause chicks to be stuck in their egg. I believe that you should give a chick a chance to live. If it turns out weak and dies on its own, at least it had a chance. I've helped several chicks out before, and all of them have turned out just as strong and healthy as their hatchmates.

    Good luck with the hatch!
     
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