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finding a horse trainer

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by arabianequine, Nov 21, 2010.

  1. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    How do I pick a new horse trainer? What to look for in a horse trainer? I have one but want to find one a bit closer maybe.
     
  2. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    The most important thing in choosing a trainer is knowing exactly what you want, what your goals are. That's the one thing that will really help you make a choice that makes you happy.

    Usually, so few trainers are really accessible(or affordable), that many people's choice gets 'made for them'. Most people need some one who will come to their farm or at least, teach somewhere nearby where they can trailer quickly to.

    It also depends if you want lessons, or want the trainer to ride and train your horse. If you want the trainer to spend a block of time training your horse, you might be more willing to 'send him away' for a block of time, and location of the trainer might be less important.

    But if you want frequent lessons, or want to follow up a training period with lessons (a really great idea), the trainer's location (near by) gets important again.

    If you have a number of people to choose from that are accessible and affordable, then what's important to you? What do you want to achieve?

    For many people, they don't want a ton of pressure on them. A timid rider might not want to be scolded if he's afraid of doing something new. On the other hand, fearless rider might get bored with a trainer that doesn't push him some. Some people like the 'tough man' approach, a trainer who acts like an athletic coach or drill sargeant! On the other hand some people just can't stand that, and want someone who explains things in detail and gives them time to work it out. Finding someone who fits your style is really important.

    The most important thing to recreational riders is usually to have an obedient and safe horse they can enjoy riding. They want to be able to control the horse's speed, steer him, and have him be a pleasure to deal with - willing to stand still on a looped rein, willing to cross water, or ride out alone, not shying, bucking or running away, not refusing to ride out from the stable. Staying tied up for long periods might be needed for trail rides and such.

    If they also want to horse show, then they have additional needs in a trainer - that he/she knows that type of showing, and can teach the horse and rider in that type of riding. Too, not everyone is obsessed with competing - training for a show might mean doing reasonably well on an average horse and having a relaxed time.

    If one really is interested in competing intensely, then choosing a teacher is tougher. That person has to be really 'plugged in' to that type of riding and know it backwards and forwards....usually from years of competing and winning, even at the top levels.
     
  3. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

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    Jun 8, 2008
    NE Michigan
    Word of mouth is usually the best way as the really good trainers seldom advertise. However, if the trainer is not advertising, s/he may not have any openings available. If there are several qualified trainers in your area, then decide what exactly do you want to do with horses. If you want to just trail ride, let the trainer know. A trainer that is specialized in a discipline may not be willing to take on a recreational horse when they have a reining/jumper/dressage/breed show to go to every weekend with client horses. However, some will. Talk with the trainer over the phone and ask if you can watch them work a horse or see their facilities. AFter this, you should be able to get a vibe from the trainer.

    Checking some online horse classified off DreamHorse might work too. Since you have an Arab, check out www.arabianhorses.org and they have lists of Arabian stables in the area. Browse through horses for sale too to see if a trainer is selling a horse because I know for MI, not all the Arab trainers are listed in the Discovery Farms or Mentor Listing or Stables.
     
  4. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    There are two things I want different. I want more time at the place my horse is being worked at, with the trainer, and my horse. That is something I did not get much of last time she was there. I did not learn near enough or get the hands on experience I needed or wanted. I also did not like some of the things I seen but she was improved but I think more because of fear not because she learned to or wanted to.

    This above trainer was by word of mouth and known by family. He is good but I think a bit rough sometimes. He would work more with me if I went there so that was kinda my fault not his and the distance. I was working alot then and traveling so when came by I would always stop and spend some time there. I went there on Easter too just cause I was home. The weather was bad so she was acting bad.

    I do live in a pretty small town and out a bit. I would like someone to come here to but not sure if that is possible for anyone.

    I do just want to learn to ride and her trained to ride eventually. My arab is just over two. My plan is to just ride in the arena or trail ride.
     
  5. Skittlez

    Skittlez Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 29, 2010
    Rockford
    It sounds like you are leaning more towards lessons. I would look into someone who came come to your place and give you lessons with your horse. A good instructor can show you how to achieve what you want and also be able to tell if the horse is doing it correctly also. That way both of you is learning the same thing at the same time. You should be able to practice what you have learned in between lessons. With your Arab being only two, I suspect you will be doing mostly ground work and tacking up and not much riding.

    If you decide to send the horse to a trainer make sure you really take your time and ask lots of questions. A good, honest trainer has an open door policy. You should be able to stop by unannouced during business hours and observe a lesson quietly. Even if the trainer is not working your horse, you can see how the trainer is with any horse. A trainer should have no problems answering all your questions, showing you the whole property, and being able to give you good refrences. A trainer should also be able to give you the name and number of their vet and farrier. These are also good refrences about the general upkeep of the horses. The trainer should also be willing to show you what food they are feeding the horses and you should be able to look at it. You should also be able to come and see your horse at any time. Many trainers will give you a weekly lesson also during your training period. Your trainer should also be knowledgable of your breed. Arabs don't tend to do well with stock horse trainers. They have a different mind set and require a trainer who knows the difference in personality. A good trainer will not lump all horses into one method of training. They will know the difference in breed mentality and will adjust their training as needed.

    I would shy away from a trainer who is vague on questions, does not have an open door policy, or will not give name and number of vet and farrier. Also look at the other horses. Do they have marks on them, cuts, missing hair, chipped hooves, etc. They may be a heavy handed trainer, or have barn help that is not so nice. Obviously a trainer will not admit to being harsh, but sometimes looking at the other horse and how they behave, can give you a clue if something is just not quite right.

    Finding the right trainer can be very frustration so don't be afraid to talk to as many people about them as possible. Follow your gut and you will find the one that fits your needs.
     
  6. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    I took some bird feed out under the feed shelter which is half horse shelter and half feed misc. storage area. and my arab filly of course thinks it is feeding time and wants food but it was not time yet.

    I went to the gate to pet her and she reared up....kinda scares me like she is ticked seems as though she would claw me. What do I do to that? I am on the outside of the gate and she is on the inside but still. I went and got a lead line and she did let me pet her a bit after that and seemed a bit jumpy. Hence why I think she jumped once when looking away she seen the rope move out of the corner of her eye I was not using it then but was gonna if needed. I was gonna wack her with it on the butt or shoulder or something if she did it again or got too nasty. I did put it all away and left and came inside.
     
  7. WIChookchick

    WIChookchick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 25, 2010
    Rural Brooklyn, WI
    I think you need to desensitize your filly with daily handling and using a rope around her, as a grooming "tool", having it in your hand when you do things around her... and handling her daily to teach her some manners...
    A simple loud "NO!" and waving your arms or arm at her would also be enough to send her a strong message.

    You say here
    There are two things I want different. I want more time at the place my horse is being worked at, with the trainer, and my horse. That is something I did not get much of last time she was there. I did not learn near enough or get the hands on experience I needed or wanted.

    You actually want and need two different things, your filly needs to be trained. And you need lessons.. IT SHOULD NOT be on the same animal. You will confuse your filly, and unless you are going to be there daily. And do as the trainer says, follow what they say and do things how they tell you to do them. Let the trainer to their job. ( I am having a similar issue, a lady hired me to work with her yearling filly she is buying from some friends of mine, and keeping it there for now. She wants to be part of training the filly, to teach her, as she herself is learning, she is a 50 something person, and a rank newbie. I give her "homework" to help her to help desensitize the filly, to handle her correctly, and to help the filly be ready when she is a little older for saddling, line driving, lunging... has she done it? NO, not once. And now I think she realizes this is too much, I haven't heard from her.)

    I do have one very big question for you though..
    You have said you weigh 270 pounds.. OR with a saddle, you and the saddle weigh that much....
    Do you really think a 2 coming 3 yr old filly can carry you? Don't you think it would either be more prudent to teach her to drive, and buy a buggy, take driving lessons, and enjoy her until she is fully mature. And then re-assess your desire and weight to ride her ?
    Its just from what you have stated on your, searching for a horse thread, I think you should look at your weight and your filly's ability, and see what direction would work best for you both.

    I hope you don't take this in any way but helpful.

    carol​
     
  8. ultasol

    ultasol Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    Where are you located? I might have a couple suggestions for you that I have heard good things about.
     
  9. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    There are two things I want different. I want more time at the place my horse is being worked at, with the trainer, and my horse. That is something I did not get much of last time she was there. I did not learn near enough or get the hands on experience I needed or wanted. I also did not like some of the things I seen but she was improved but I think more because of fear not because she learned to or wanted to.

    This above trainer was by word of mouth and known by family. He is good but I think a bit rough sometimes. He would work more with me if I went there so that was kinda my fault not his and the distance. I was working alot then and traveling so when came by I would always stop and spend some time there. I went there on Easter too just cause I was home. The weather was bad so she was acting bad.

    I do live in a pretty small town and out a bit. I would like someone to come here to but not sure if that is possible for anyone.

    I do just want to learn to ride and her trained to ride eventually. My arab is just over two. My plan is to just ride in the arena or trail ride.

    --I think it's a good idea to not think of hanging around the trainer too much. They usually charge by the hour - I'd be sure I wasn't trying to get more time than what I'd paid for. The better a trainer is, the more his/her time is tightly scheduled. I wouldn't want to try to take more than I paid for.

    --If it's really just a matter of getting out there at all, if that's what you meant, then it sounds like you need someone close by, locally, to be able to go often enough?

    --Another poster wrote about dropping by any time during business hours. It depends. Some trainers ride their training horses very early in the morning, and like to be alone when they do it. SOME trainers, you need to drop by now and again just to check up on them that they actually are riding the horse. They realize that we're checking on them...but the fact is, most trainers are running around between shows, clinics, doing business, selliing, trying out horses...frankly a lot of them overbook themselves, and do tend to miss rides. Some of them do need checking on.

    --But...I will say...if you really feel the trainer needs a lot of checking on and isn't at all reliable(been there, seen that one)...it might be better to look for another trainer.

    --One of the previous posters mentioned your Arab not being suitable as a two year old. I would always wait til a horse is 3 1/2 to start training for riding. But she is right - the average Arabian wouldn't be carrying 300 lbs.

    --Don't take it the wrong way, but it really does sound like it would be a good idea to get an older, quiet horse to work around and ride. I'm not sure a 2 year old Arabian is the right match for you, perhaps because of rider weight(we had talked before about how the horse's weight relates to the rider's weight), but also because it just doesn't sound like you're ready for a young, active, green horse. I base that on comments you've made - about wanting to regain your confidence, and about what sort of things make you nervous...and based on your reaction to the filly rearing in the pen. It sounds like that completely unnerved you, even though the horse was in her paddock and not near you.

    --Even if you were to send the filly out for as many months as possible of breaking and training when she's ready, you still will get back a 'green horse'. Young horses come back from their early training, still rambunctious and timid around unfamiliar things. Horses tend to settle down about eight or ten years old - some sooner, some later.

    --Young horses do quite frequently rear. They tend to do that whenever they get excited. Waiting to be fed, seeing their horsey pals disappear over the hill without them, or being made to stand still when they have a lot of excess energy. Young horses are very immature mentally and figuring out the world. They aren't clawing at you - that's just the animal attempting to keep its balance. And they don't really think it's 'wrong' or 'bad', they are just excited. And you have an Arabian, and some Arabian bloodlines are quite nervous and excitable. Some are, some aren't.

    --Some people work up to being ready for a young green horse. Some people - they're never ready for it. It just isn't for everyone. It doesn't fit all peple. Young horses take both patience and firmness and knowing when to apply each, and a lot of - well - sometimes - courage.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2010
  10. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    Quote:You actually want and need two different things, your filly needs to be trained. And you need lessons.. IT SHOULD NOT be on the same animal. You will confuse your filly, and unless you are going to be there daily. And do as the trainer says, follow what they say and do things how they tell you to do them. Let the trainer to their job. ( I am having a similar issue, a lady hired me to work with her yearling filly she is buying from some friends of mine, and keeping it there for now. She wants to be part of training the filly, to teach her, as she herself is learning, she is a 50 something person, and a rank newbie. I give her "homework" to help her to help desensitize the filly, to handle her correctly, and to help the filly be ready when she is a little older for saddling, line driving, lunging... has she done it? NO, not once. And now I think she realizes this is too much, I haven't heard from her.)

    I do have one very big question for you though..
    You have said you weigh 270 pounds.. OR with a saddle, you and the saddle weigh that much....
    Do you really think a 2 coming 3 yr old filly can carry you? Don't you think it would either be more prudent to teach her to drive, and buy a buggy, take driving lessons, and enjoy her until she is fully mature. And then re-assess your desire and weight to ride her ?
    Its just from what you have stated on your, searching for a horse thread, I think you should look at your weight and your filly's ability, and see what direction would work best for you both.

    I hope you don't take this in any way but helpful.

    carol

    Very much helpful......but I do not want to ride her or even train to ride her yet. The work I want done now is ground manners and someone with me when I work with her to show me what to do when she acts or does certain things. She is very different from day to day you never know. I tied her up about a month ago and she had not been tied in months and she was a complete angel for like 4 hours while we cleaned a stall in there with the tractor it was long over due. She is mostly nasty over food at this point. She does this snake thing with her neck and head when I think she is agitated. People have seen her do it and can't believe she does it and does not know why and they have horses. The things I would like to do with her with someone for now is brushing her, picking up her feet, combing out her tail (I don't dare get near her butt) that is a big issue with me, trailing her and we have just not often lately, washing her, how to make her respect peoples space, and I have done all these things just not daily or as often as I should. I feel safer when someone is with me when I work with her and I want them to teach me what to do when she is acting out. I just want to be able to handle her and touch her with out being scared for now....some days she is soooo calm I just love it. I feel on those days I am in control and not scared to do whatever I want and she will just let me and I am still very cautious though cause I know she is unpredictable. She has been desensetized alot when at the trainers from 5 1/2 months old to about 8 months old and came back a lot better but since not much working with her. So probably needs a lot done again. She has had a saddle on her and had her tail brushed at that time a lady had her for a few days cause she was in heat and I had a stud here. That lady said no problems at all. She called me with in 2-3 hours of having her and said she is saddle as we talk and did nothing. She even saddled her up again the next day in front of me and my filly did nothing until the lady made her run and bucked a few times.

    I don't know if she will ever be able to handle my weight. Some people say yes she will have no problem and some say she won't be able to. I may not even weigh as much when the time comes. I will probably not even have ridding time put on her till spring of 2012 at the earliest and not by me....lol.
     

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