First Time Chick Parents, Spring 2016

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by feetkissearth, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2016
    Saint Louis, MO
    Okay, not precisely a chick, but the fact that I didn't have to wait until June for them has me dancing with joy! I've been already picking ticks for weeks...

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Leebeez

    Leebeez Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 21, 2016
    Madison, CT
    Stalking... uh I mean... reading this older thread today to look for any tips/tricks I missed. Love your seabright's attitude.. ha. I have a question about something you mentioned. What do you mean by "handling training technique"? I tried a search of this thread (although have read most of it) and couldn't find reference. Do you just mean that you handle them and get them used to it or is there an actual technique. I have 10 chicks, 7 three week olds and 3 one week olds. Is there a good technique to handle them? I've been just cupping my hands around their bodies and go with their reactions. No problems to speak of and they are all tame for the most part but would love to hear your technique.
     
  3. Dorsey34

    Dorsey34 New Egg

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    Mar 20, 2016
    Andover, MA
    Hi! We are new chick owners and picked up 6 little chicks yesterday. We have 3 welsummers, 2 Delaware and 1 Blue Cochin. So far we are having a great time watching the antics of these chickens.
     
  4. newchickjess

    newchickjess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 15, 2016
    Elysian Fields, TX
    This is my silly Mae who likes to be cuddled. I had someone tell me today that it's bad for her to be in this position. Any thoughts?
    [​IMG]
     
  5. mamatoes

    mamatoes Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 29, 2016
    Ontario

    Cool markings!
     
  6. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2016
    Saint Louis, MO

    Not sure where I actually posted what I did, but basically I did minimal handling until they finally saw me as the "food-giver". I have a brooder about 3' tall made out of cardboard. I have cut a 1/2 door into the side so I can sit on a bucket and watch my "chick TV". After they were about a week old, I started putting treats down just inside of that door. At first they were scared, but after a while they got the idea and started approaching even before I had removed my hand from the brooder. Then they were eating the treats out of my hand. Then they were perching on my hand to get at the treats. And then I introduced them to waxworms, which they went bonkers for! Mealworms are a close second. So, what would happen is that after they approached to get treats, I would swiftly scoop one of the chicks up by sliding my hand under their breast/belly, deposit them on my lap, then immediately present the cup of waxworms. I'd let them eat a few, then put them back and get another chick. Pretty soon I was petting them, touching their feet, etc. while they were getting waxworms. I had a line of chicks waiting for their turn on my lap! And then I started decreasing the treats and just doing the petting. A few of them made the transition to lap chickens, but ALL of them let me handle them without freaking out which was my ultimate goal. It will make stuff like health checks, leg band changes, etc. SO much easier.

    One of my lap chickens has a special trill for asking for lap time...it is adorable. She makes the trill, I sit down, she jumps up, and we cuddle for a bit.
     
  7. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2016
    Saint Louis, MO

    It does increase the pressure on their lungs thanks to chicken anatomy--the stomach, gizzard, liver, and gall bladder can all press on them when the chick is flipped. It's often used to explain why a chicken is hypnotized by being put on its back...less oxygen...although I'm not sure if that's true or not. Safest to limit the amount of time they spend on their backs just in case?
     
  8. kekstrom

    kekstrom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2016
    Southern Oregon
    Welcome! [​IMG] Sounds like you have some unique and beautiful and likely ADORABLE little chickies! Any pics? We love pics. [​IMG]
     
  9. collie1470

    collie1470 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 5, 2015
    Wilton, ME
    Tonic immobility. There's a specific term for the flipped on the back thing but I forget it. But it's a response that occurs across species, not just in chickens. Dogs, rabbits, sharks, birds, frogs, etc, etc, etc. I think it's similar to playing possum....acting dead or sick while vulnerable (belly up) so they're less likely to be harmed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2016
  10. collie1470

    collie1470 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 5, 2015
    Wilton, ME
    I used to do it with frogs and lizards when I was little.
     

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