Selsee

Chirping
Feb 17, 2018
34
37
54
my eggs are a couple days late but I floated them and all the ones that moved, sunk. I also candled them and it was completely dark. Was floating them a bad idea?
 

007Sean

Face it, Embrace it, Ace it, Replace it
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Oct 25, 2015
33,300
198,379
1,642
South Central Texas
Personally I wouldn't do a float test. It takes the protective "bloom" off the egg. Candling is a tried and true test for determing embryo development. With "floating" outside interferences (bumping the table, vibrations) can make it appear to wobble when infact it didn't.
 

Selsee

Chirping
Feb 17, 2018
34
37
54
Personally I wouldn't do a float test. It takes the protective "bloom" off the egg. Candling is a tried and true test for determing embryo development. With "floating" outside interferences (bumping the table, vibrations) can make it appear to wobble when infact it didn't.

I waited for all the eggs to still themselves. The ones that moved, I waited carefully for to make sure they actually did.
 

paneubert

Songster
Nov 20, 2015
1,963
2,771
241
Snohomish County, Washington State
My Coop
My Coop
Setting aside all the opinions about float testing at all, the fact that yours sunk is a bad thing. The common wisdom (unless I am completely remembering wrong) is that the viable eggs are going to barely sink/barely float. Like 1/4 of the egg is above water, and the part above water is the round end and not the pointy end. If it sinks, the assumption is that the air cell in the egg is tiny and the chick will drown. Or it is a super fresh egg that hasn't even had a chance to incubate. High floaters means the chick did not develop and a lot of air is in there.

If they were late and they sunk, that begs the question about what your humidity was for the incubation. Why did the eggs not develop good sized air cells.
 

Selsee

Chirping
Feb 17, 2018
34
37
54
Setting aside all the opinions about float testing at all, the fact that yours sunk is a bad thing. The common wisdom (unless I am completely remembering wrong) is that the viable eggs are going to barely sink/barely float. Like 1/4 of the egg is above water, and the part above water is the round end and not the pointy end. If it sinks, the assumption is that the air cell in the egg is tiny and the chick will drown. Or it is a super fresh egg that hasn't even had a chance to incubate. High floaters means the chick did not develop and a lot of air is in there.

If they were late and they sunk, that begs the question about what your humidity was for the incubation. Why did the eggs not develop good sized air cells.

I don’t have a formal humidity measurer. My incubator said to put in 1liter of water at a time.

Should I do an assisted hatch? I don’t want them to die :(
 

Selsee

Chirping
Feb 17, 2018
34
37
54
I did end up doing an assisted hatch. I only opened around their beaks and I’m going to let them do the rest on their own. :D
 

Selsee

Chirping
Feb 17, 2018
34
37
54
My eyes did this :eek:when you said that. How big is this incubator? What brand? How often did you add another liter of water? That seems both like wayyyyyyyyy too much water, and a bad way to incubate in general. You really need to be able to monitor humidity....

I meant milliliter!! Sorry about that.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom