Genomes

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by Mr D, Aug 22, 2019.

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  1. nicalandia

    nicalandia Crowing

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    Broodiness has been found to be a recessive polygenic trait with many of those genes being sex linked also, in a study of a reciprocal cross of Red Jungle Fowl and White Leghorn it was found that 87% of RJF hens went broody when nest was left intact and that only 11% of the WL x RJF cross, the reciprocal cross(RJF x WL) went broddy 63% of the time.

    Study: Body Growth, Egg Production, Broodiness, Age at First Egg and Egg Size in Red Jungle Fowls, and an Attempt at Their Genetic Analyses by the ReciprocaI Crossing with White Leghorns https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jpsa1964/16/3/16_3_121/_pdf

    Excerpt: "From the results presented above, it is concluded that three polygenic traits, egg production, age at first egg and broodiness, participate in the sex-linked inheritance."
     
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  2. Mr D

    Mr D Chirping

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    So the Broodyness is sex-linked, inherited from the Sire? 11% of the WL Roo x RJF Hen cross, the reciprocal cross (RJF Roo x WL Hen) went broody 63% of the time?
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  3. nicalandia

    nicalandia Crowing

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    Polygenic in nature but at least two of those genes found to be sex linked by reciprocal cross test mating.

    I was able to confirm the research when I crossed a black Silkie rooster with a White leghorn hen(back then in hopes to reproduce a Cemani like bird) the 100% of the F1s went broody(about 6 hens), were really poor egg layers of small sized eggs, it was not until the Back Cross to Leghorn when performance was increase.
     
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  4. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    The SFH has a variety of possible combinations. There is no firm standard for coloration, but the standard set by the Swedish Gene Bank is that than they MUST have mottling, a single comb and four toes on each foot. Skin color can be white or yellow, or lightly mottled. Beyond this, they can be any color or combination of colors and even be crested.
    As for plumage coloration, most birds have either E (extended black) or eb (partridge), and though I have seen a few e+ (wild type) as well, they are not very common. I've only had 3 in the last 7 years of breeding the SFH. E-based birds are often heterozygous with plenty of leakage. The eb-based birds are typically mille fleur patterned.
    The black pigment varies in all shades of blue black and splash. Many of us (SFH breeders) refer to their birds as black-based, blue-based or splash-based, in reference to this gene.
    The red pigments also vary from dilute (often referred to as sno-leopard) to mahogany.
    Other genes that may be involved are the melanizing gene and the Columbian gene (responsible for the mille fleur pattern) and even the pattern gene (Pg). Pg is not present in all birds, but I have seen and bred birds that could be considered incompletely laced, supporting this idea.
    Another gene that appears infrequently is the dominant white. When heterozygous, many of these birds appear red/white and may be mistaken for a splash based bird, but when bred to any other color, can produce black-based offspring.
    Hope this helps explain the confusion that is the SFH "color pattern".
    Here are a few images...

    upload_2019-9-22_23-2-9.png
    A painting done by Leigh Schilling Edwards of one of the original SFH roosters imported by Greenfire Farms.

    upload_2019-9-22_23-4-4.png
    Another group of photos, compiled by Leigh Schilling Edwards, of some of her own birds showing the variety of colors possible.
    The rooster, 3rd row, first column on the left, is an example of the dominant white effect in the SFH. This cock produces blue and black based offspring, proving that he is not, in fact, a splash.

    upload_2019-9-22_23-9-22.png
    One of my own cockerels, showing an age progression from E-based chick through adult. He also carried Mahogany and the crested gene.

    upload_2019-9-22_23-12-23.png
    A melanized mille fleur hen showing the black hackles common to Ml.

    upload_2019-9-22_23-13-38.png
    A group of youngsters. Four carrying E, two are blue, one is also Ml (front left). The rear-most chick is a black-based mille fleur cockerel with eb.
     
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  5. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    It depends entirely on the coloration of the SFH used...
    Black Copper Marans are essentially red Birchen (eR - brown-red is another name in some breeds for the same color).
    So if you breed with the typical mille fleur patterned bird, you'll likely get poorly patterned birchen birds IMO. With a bird that's E-??, you'll get leaky blacks.
     
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  6. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    That first image shown of the red/white cock... He was one of GFF's first imports and test breeding from that line showed he was, actually, a dominant white carrier (see my earlier post). Leigh Schilling Edwards has one of his grandsons, who has proven time and again, to be able to throw black based offspring (bl+/bl+). I have also bred birds of this color and proven this as well (pic of my own chicks last summer, by a red/white hen and a black mille cock - the melanized blue on the right was out of a different pen).
    upload_2019-9-22_23-31-19.png

    As for the second cock pictured behing mahogany, i'll disagree again there. He appears to be just 'normal' red mille coloration. the hackles wouldn't be nearly as orangey, if he were Mh. (Again, see my previous comments and image of the E & Mh crested cockerel.)
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2019
  7. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    I agree with you
     
  8. nicalandia

    nicalandia Crowing

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    Thanks for clarifying that is Dominant White, it also hides blue and with mottling the effect is enhanced.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2019
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