Grain Allergies Question

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by redsix, Oct 14, 2017.

  1. redsix

    redsix Chirping

    285
    24
    94
    Feb 14, 2015
    Virginia
    I know this is a tough question. My wife recently found out that she is allergic to wheat, barley and rye. I have been sprouting grains for the chickens (wheat and barley). Does anyone know if feeding sprouted grain would result in any less impact to the wheat or barley content in the eggs?
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,643
    907
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    From my understanding of the way the digestive system works, there should be no issue in her eating the eggs even if the birds ate the grains she was allergic to. If this is an issue, I'd love to see the medical journal articles, or other documented studies that point to this being an issue.
     
  3. venymae

    venymae Prairie Wind

    1,948
    2,181
    311
    Aug 18, 2014
    Manhappiness, Kansas
    My Coop
    I have no idea about eggs, but I DO know that peanut proteins can travel through breast milk. (Source: friend found out her newborn son was allergic to peanuts by eating a peanut butter sandwich, at the time she had no idea what was going on, but it almost killed him. They tested him for allergies and it was peanuts, and they were told she had to pump and dump for a while and have a peanut free diet while breastfeeding because the proteins can be transferred through the milk. SHEESH!) So maybe test it out first? Have some benedryl on hand?
     
  4. Molpet

    Molpet Crossing the Road

    something else is the dust from the wheat, if she comes in contact with it on you or the chickens she may have an issue... I can't even use wheat straw.

    before I got chickens (this time around) I was getting eggs from a woman who had feed that didn't have wheat in it... all of a sudden I had issues, I cut out her eggs and all was normal.. I found out she had switch feeds and it had wheat... I bought my own hens and haven't had any issues... at least from eggs.
     
  5. redsix

    redsix Chirping

    285
    24
    94
    Feb 14, 2015
    Virginia
    What kind of feed do you buy? The layer feed that I buy just says "feed grains". I'm sure it has wheat in it as well.
     
  6. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

    14,110
    14,089
    716
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    If she is allergic to wheat, It would be best to not have wheat sprouts or chaff available, and that includes in the chicken feed, when she's likely to be in the coop, or handling birds that have wheat on their feathers. Likewise the barley and rye. There should be feeds available if you look (I hope!). Otherwise, at least she should always wear a good face mask out there so she's not inhaling offending grain dust. Then it also depends on just how reactive she is to the stuff, and what else is on her list. Other grasses? Completely allergy tested for other environmental triggers? Meds and allergy shots do help, I know. Mary
     
  7. Molpet

    Molpet Crossing the Road

    I buy from 2 organic feed mills, they will make with what ever ingredients you need.

    the chicken feed, 'wolf co-op' is delivered by a farmer who goes to a feed mill in Indiana, which is 151 miles away from me...she markes it up and my cost is the same as if I bought it from the mill I get the turkey feed from. She goes there and out my way regularly
    the turkey is from an organic mill 75 miles away.
     
  8. redsix

    redsix Chirping

    285
    24
    94
    Feb 14, 2015
    Virginia
    That also makes me wonder about cows milk. The dairy pellets that cows get probably has
    wheat in it.

    My wife doesn't spend any time at the chicken house or handling chickens. I think her only issue is eating something that has wheat, barley, or rye in it and it's not the gluten that she is allergic to.
     
  9. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

    14,110
    14,089
    716
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    There's not wheat in milk or eggs, regardless of what's fed to the cows, goats, or hens. There would be wheat chaff in the environment around that feed and the coops or barns, that's all. Mary
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: