Grit and oyster shells

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Isabella F, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. Isabella F

    Isabella F Chirping

    153
    40
    76
    Jun 10, 2017
    Ct
    What's the best way to feed grit and/ or oyster shells to chickens?
     
    sassysarah123 likes this.
  2. Provide free choice oyster shell, and scatter grit on the ground
     
    sassysarah123 likes this.
  3. sassysarah

    sassysarah Crossing the Road

    4,194
    9,047
    757
    Apr 3, 2017
    Oklahoma
    My Coop
    Chicken don't need grit if they are outside. They can find plenty of it in the dirt.
    Chicks are mostly kept in bin or something, so they will need grit. I always just mixed it in with their food, that way they can have it when eating.
     
  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. .....

    20,379
    14,318
    751
    Mar 9, 2014
    Oregon
    My Coop
    The first statement is not universally true as soil type varies considerably from one location to the next. Not all soils provide sufficient appropriate for materiel. Grit is so inexpensive I classify it as better to have and not need than need and not have....and supply it free choice to my flock just as I do oyster shell.
     
  5. sassysarah

    sassysarah Crossing the Road

    4,194
    9,047
    757
    Apr 3, 2017
    Oklahoma
    My Coop
    I never give grit to my birds, but mine free range. It is not necessary, but good to have on hand.
     
  6. GC-Raptor

    GC-Raptor Crowing

    2,678
    3,038
    331
    Jul 26, 2016
    Connecticut, U.S.A.
    I offer it in separate containers, oyster shell near feed in coop 20160819_102752.jpg and grit away from feed. In my raised coop grit is under coop. 20170503_093342.jpg GC
     
    sassysarah123 and Wickedchicken6 like this.
  7. DLE140

    DLE140 Songster

    124
    319
    141
    Oct 25, 2015
    Pa
    I keep a feed tray of each of grit and oyster shell.
     
    sassysarah123 likes this.
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,643
    907
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    Agreed on both counts. I have seen areas where there is nothing on the ground, EVERYWHERE but silty/sandy/soil. Not a speck of grit to be seen. I was talking to a lady yesterday, and she said that there are NO rocks where she lives. Absolutely NO rocks. She lives in an area that has been built up by repeated flooding from a major river, so, the area is a combination of silt and clay. While I do have ample grit in my soil, if my chicks are in a tractor that is moved frequently enough that they don't destroy the turf, they need supplemental grit. I always give grit to my chicks. But, if you have a gravel driveway, you can most likely find appropriate grit simply by scooping it up with a flat blade shovel! And, I never go into the winter without having a good supply of grit on hand. The ground is frozen solid here for about 5 months. No grit available then! I don't consider grit to be inexpensive: I pay $10/bag. That's pretty costly, imo for a bunch of coarse gravel/pebbles, but it's cheap insurance to ensure that your birds have what they need to process their feed properly.
     
  9. ChickenMammX4

    ChickenMammX4 Songster

    1,044
    238
    161
    Mar 17, 2015
    SW Ohio
    We have a homemade wood dispenser that hangs on the wall of the coop, one side has grit, the other oyster shell. The chickens take what they need.
     
  10. coopdeville15

    coopdeville15 Chirping

    97
    30
    91
    Apr 21, 2015
    Abita Springs, LA
    Free choice of both, sandy clay soil in the chicken run. Two separate dishes near the feeder but off to the side. It gets used up and replaced as needed.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: