Hatching question.....update..new question.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Hoosiermomma, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. Hoosiermomma

    Hoosiermomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    S.E Ind
    Okay so here goes. I had six lavender cochin eggs in the bator. Friday I candled all of them and there was nothing in any except one. Well I couldn't see anything definite so I kept it in the bator and threw the rest out. Well today, day 21, I went in to check on the egg and was getting ready to throw it out when I hear peeping inside. Scared the bejeepers out of me so I put it back in the bator. The temp has been consistent and I have had a small cup of water in there for humidity. No I don't have a hyrgometer just the thermometer. So anyway I hear the peeping but no pipping is going on. Should I wait and see what happens or should I start a hole for the chick to begin his pipping? If I should wait, how long before I should intervene? I don't want to lost this one as it is the only cochin out of 24+ cochin eggs that have developed. I would appreciate any suggestions or advice you can give on what to do, if anything. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 4, 2009
  2. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    Wait!! I haven't hatched and am only posting because it's so late at night that I don't know if you'll get a more experienced response before morning.

    I've been reading up on hatching in preperation for my first attempt and over and over I see DON'T OPEN THE INCUBATOR.

    It seems as though they routinely start cheeping a day or more before they pip and can take up to 48 hours from pipping to hatching. I've also seen many people reporting problems from dropping humidity when the incubators are opened. The membrane can dry on the chick and make it impossible to hatch. I believe it's called "shrink wrapping" the chick. Hopefully yours will be ok since it hasn't pipped yet, but try to resist the temptation to help. [​IMG]

    Good luck! I'm sure you'll get more responses to your questions in the morning.
     
  3. Hoosiermomma

    Hoosiermomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    S.E Ind
    I have a gut feeling that there needs to be more humidity for the chick to hatch. How can I up the humidity in a quick manner?
     
  4. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    I've seen posts where people have added a wet sponge....I think using hot water on the sponge would work better, but I really don't know for sure. If you really think it needs the extra boost just don't open the bator any more then you have to and be quick.

    Good luck! Happy hatching thoughts going your way. [​IMG]
     
  5. Rogue_Woman

    Rogue_Woman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2008
    NC
    Let the chick have a chance to hatch before you poke a hole. If you put a damp washcloth in there, it will raise the humidity almost immediately...wet the washcloth then wring it out well. Good luck with your little one!

    ETA: Warm water on that washcloth, sorry I didn't specify!
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2009
  6. Hoosiermomma

    Hoosiermomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    S.E Ind
    Thanks I'll try that. I just don't want to lose this one. My last two I lost, they pipped and started to zip, then died. On the one if I had intervened I think it would have made it but on the other it wouldn't have been able to make it regardless. So I on the fence about when to help, if at all. I'll kind of hold off and see what happens today. Is there a 'window' of time that I need to watch for where it would be imperative to help? Are there any signs to look for to know whether or not the chick can't get out by itself?
     
  7. mandelyn

    mandelyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 30, 2009
    Goshen, OH
    I never helped mine until they were half way "unzipped"... just because earlier than that the chick may not do so well and they don't make it.

    If you hold the egg to your ear, do you here any tapping? If they're on their way, you can hear them inside chipping with a couple peeps inbetween. I always talked back to mine when they peeped.

    If there's no more noise, then the chick was too weak to to start, let alone to finish, and so helping it may have ended sadly anyways.

    I hope he makes it out though!
     
  8. Hoosiermomma

    Hoosiermomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    S.E Ind
    Thanks for the suggestions. I don't know how everyone here who hatches does it. The impatience is awful !!!![​IMG]
     
  9. mandelyn

    mandelyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 30, 2009
    Goshen, OH
    You know, my patience and tolerance has greatly increased when I got into chickens.

    So has my ability to just let things be. Now I just try to not handle the eggs much at all except to turn, and I keep the incubator closed unless I NEED to be in it. I candle twice, day 7, day 14.

    For awhile I would add 2-3 eggs every day... so that 21 days later, I'd have chicks due.. every day. I know you're not supposed to do that... so I seperated them with rolled up wash rags. And they hatched, 1-3 a day, sometimes not, but usually atleast 1.

    Hatching was so regular then... the excitement went away and I was able to handle waiting 21 days to do a proper hatch. I was at the flea market every month with chicks though, so don't go hatching crazy unless you have an out for the resulting fowl!

    Luckily they were bantams and didn't take up much room... Seabrights in 2 colors, OE Game various colors, Blue silkies, Black Japanese, bunch of others. I learned to mark eggs that's for sure. Otherwise I had no idea what was coming out of them!
     
  10. Hoosiermomma

    Hoosiermomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    S.E Ind
    I too believe in letting things be but since the other 24+ eggs didn't develop then I am really wanting this one to be successful. [​IMG]
     

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